Anything related to this is very important

The Opportunity in Adversity

By Eckhart Tolle

Life unfolds between the polarities of order and chaos. It is important at this time to recognize these two fundamental opposites, without which the world could not even be. Another word for disorder is “adversity.” When it becomes more extreme, we might call it “chaos.”

We would prefer, of course, to have order in our lives, which means to have things going well. We would like relative harmony in our lives. Yet, that very often is marred by the eruption of some form of disorder. And, usually, we resent that—we get angry, or despondent, or sad.

Disorder comes in many, many forms, big and small. When disorder comes it usually creates a kind of havoc in our lives, accompanied by strong underlying beliefs. “There’s something very wrong, this should not be happening, maybe God is against me,” and so on. Again, we need to understand that disorder, or adversity, is inevitable and is an essential part of a higher order.

 From a higher perspective, a higher level, the existence of order and disorder, or order and chaos, is a necessary part of the evolution of life.

 Many people have found that they experience a deepening, or a deeper sense of self or beingness, immediately after and as a result of having endured a period of disorder or chaos. This is sometimes called “the dark night of the soul,” a term from medieval Christianity used to describe the mental breakdown that many mystics experienced prior to awakening spiritually. There was an eruption of disorder, of destruction. Then, out of that, a deeper realization arose.

 And although that can be very painful, the strange thing is, it’s precisely there that many humans experience a transcendence. A strange fact is that it almost never happens that people awaken spiritually while they’re in their comfort zone. Or that they become deeper as human beings, which would be a partial awakening. It almost never happens. The place where the evolutionary shift happens, or the evolutionary leap, is usually the experience of disorder in a person’s life.

And so your life then moves between order and disorder. You have both, and they’re both necessary. There’s no guarantee that when disorder erupts this will bring about an awakening or a deepening, but there’s always the possibility. It is an opportunity, but often, it is missed.

 So here we are at this time, and our mission is the same: to align with the present moment, with whatever is happening here and now. The upheaval that we’re experiencing at the present time probably will not be the last upheaval that’s going to come on a collective level. However, it is an opportunity—because although this is a time for upheavals, it is also a time for awakening. The two go together. Just as in an individual life, you need adversity to awaken. It’s an opportunity but not a guarantee. And so what looks tragic and unpleasant on a conventional level is actually perfectly fine and as it should be on a higher level; it would not be happening otherwise. It’s all part of the awakening of human beings and of planetary awakening.

To learn more about Eckhart’s teachings on Conscious Manifestation, click here.

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The post The Opportunity in Adversity appeared first on Eckhart Tolle | Official Site – Spiritual Teachings and Tools For Personal Growth and Happiness.

Cool info really good more on method please

Does self-care ever feel overwhelming or like another thing on your to-do list? Maybe you feel like you desperately need self-care, but you’re never sure exactly what you need in the moment. This leads to a quick Google for “self-care ideas” which gives you a million suggestions that leave you feeling more stressed out than when you started.

Learn about the seven pillars of self-care and take the self-care quiz to see which type of self-care you need right now.

There’s a lot of information out there about self-care, and it’s a complex topic that only makes things more confusing. All you know is that you need to take care of yourself, but you’re not sure what that should look like.

I have a simple solution to avoid overwhelm: look at self-care in terms of seven pillars. Seven might sound like a lot, but once you know them, you can better recognize what needs work in your life instead of trying to do everything. Plus I’ve created a self-care quiz you can take to see which type of self-care you need right now!

Overview of the Pillars


The seven pillars of self-care work together to bring a sense of wholeness to your life. I previously wrote about the five dimensions of self-care in this post, but I’ve added two other elements because I felt like they were missing from the original list: recreational and environmental.

7 pillars of self-care

The pillars of self-care:

  1. Mental
  2. Emotional
  3. Physical
  4. Environmental
  5. Spiritual
  6. Recreational
  7. Social

How to use them:

Seeing this list might feel overwhelming. You might think you have to find some kind of perfect balance between them all.

You don’t need to focus on finding a perfect balance between them all. Instead, you might need to focus on one area for a day, a week, maybe even a month. When you’re ready, you can focus on others.

What’s most important is noticing which one area needs attention so that it doesn’t start dragging the other areas down with it.

Now that we’re a little less overwhelmed, let’s explore the pillars of self-care in more detail:

The 7 Pillars of Self-Care


1. Mental Self-Care

Mental self-care

Mental/intellectual self-care is about cultivating a healthy mindset through mindfulness and curiosity. Mental self-care is important for developing a healthy mindset, growing your skills, reducing stress, and enhancing your knowledge and creativity.

Examples of mental self-care:


2. Emotional Self-Care

Emotional self-care

Emotional self-care involves taking care of matters of the heart with healthy coping strategies and self-compassion. Tapping into emotional self-care helps you understand yourself more, better deal with challenges and setbacks, and develop healthy emotional responses.

Examples of emotional self-care:

  • Watching a deep movie
  • Listening to your favorite songs
  • Writing down positive affirmations
  • Asking for help when you need it
  • Setting boundaries to protect your time and energy

3. Physical Self-Care

Physical self-care

Physical self-care involves taking care of your body with exercise, nutrition, good hygiene, and proper sleep. When you practice activities for your physical well-being, you can increase your energy levels and boost your self-esteem.

Examples of physical self-care:

  • Eating meals at regular times (breakfast, lunch, and dinner)
  • Drinking more water
  • Taking vitamins daily
  • Getting 7-8 hours of sleep
  • Trying a new workout class or video (here’s a playlist)

4. Environmental Self-Care

Environmental self-care

Environmental self-care involves taking care of the spaces and places around you. The more you take care of your immediate environment, the more it will help you to thrive and feel a sense of belonging where you are.

Examples of environmental self-care:

  • Arranging your workspace to be more comfortable
  • Exploring somewhere new (even if it’s in your own town)
  • Decluttering your living space
  • Going outside for a walk
  • Appealing to your five senses (e.g. light a candle, adjust the lighting, put on comfortable clothes, sip a warm drink, and put on your favorite playlist)

5. Spiritual Self-Care

Spiritual self-care

Spiritual self-care involves taking care of your soul through activities or practices that provide a sense of purpose, direction, or meaning to your life. Dedicating time to spiritual self-care can help you find more meaning in life, feel more grounded, and develop a sense of belonging in life.

Examples of spiritual self-care:

  • Spending time in nature
  • Finding a community to contribute to (online or offline)
  • Identifying your values & what’s meaningful to you
  • Volunteering or contributing to a cause you believe in
  • Connecting to a higher power (whatever that means to you)

6. Recreational Self-Care

Recreational self-care

Recreational self-care involves taking care of your inner child with hobbies, fun activities, and new experiences. Recreation is important because it lets you get away from the pressure of your to-do list and simply enjoy the pleasures that life has to offer.

Examples of recreational self-care:

  • Taking time for hobbies and creative activities
  • Going on an adventure by yourself or with others
  • Taking time to do absolutely nothing (and enjoying it!)
  • Playing board or video games
  • Switching up your regular daily routine

7. Social Self-Care

Social self-care

Even though self-care is about you, it’s important to connect with other human beings on a regular basis. Social self-care means cultivating healthy relationships and connecting with people who get you. Seeking out positive social connections helps us create a sense of belonging and acceptance. 

Examples of social self-care:

  • Spending time with people whose company you enjoy
  • Calling or seeing your relatives
  • Writing a letter to a friend (pen-pal style!)
  • Talking to a support group
  • Chatting in an online forum or community

Which pillar do you need to focus on? Take the self-care quiz!

Self-care quiz

If you’re not sure which pillar of self-care you need most, take the self-care quiz to find out what to focus on first.

My hope is that this quiz will become a tool you use whenever you feel indecisive or unsure of the type of self-care you need. Come back to it whenever you need it!

Take this quiz here. Feel free to let me know your results in a comment below!

The post The 7 Pillars of Self-Care and How To Use Them appeared first on The Blissful Mind.

Important Info !

A couple of years ago, I stumbled across some research and articles about pornography and the negative effects it could be having on men and their sex lives. I found it interesting, but never gave it too much thought after that. Then sometime last year I stumbled across this video:

It caught my attention because not only had I struggled with sexual anxiety and bouts of being unable to perform in the past, but I had also talked to a lot of men who struggled with the same issues, men often in their 20s and 30s, men who shouldn’t have been dealing with performance issues.

Then after some research, I found a survey by Esquire that showed that 43% of men reported difficulty getting or maintaining an erection at least some of the time, with 24% reporting that they had difficulty “more often than I’d like to admit.”

The Dangers of Porn

According to the science, porn is a “supranormal” stimulus—it activates the normal reward mechanisms in our brains, but it does so at such a high level that we perceive it to be way more pleasurable than the average arousing stimulus.1

But our brains become desensitized and develop a need for even more novel stimuli in order to reach the same level of arousal and excitement.2 Thus begins the spiral into more hardcore porn and higher quantities of it.

In some cases, men can develop a psychological addiction to pornography and it can begin to interfere with their sex and social lives. In rare cases, it can be debilitating in both.

Porn addiction has been found to result in anxiety,3 lower self-esteem and diminished identity,4 as well as feeling more isolated5 for the male addict. Not only this, it produces many of the same negative effects for their female partner and can lead to the latter suffering from feelings of shame and inadequacy.6,7

Apart from the impact on the individual, porn addiction can lead to sexual problems in a relationship, a deterioration of trust and safety, a perception of rejection as well as a fundamental change in how the women view their addicted partner, from “good” to “inherently bad.”8

Researchers debate whether or not porn addiction is a real addiction, but there is evidence suggesting porn addiction leads to structural changes in the brain9 and shares similar basic mechanisms with substance addiction.10,11

The debate remains unresolved, but the semantics don’t change the fact that many people experience real problems with porn. It’s been implicated in things like unhappy and unsatisfied partners,12 as well as depression, anxiety, and loneliness.13 It has even been shown to weaken commitment in a romantic relationship14 and lead to fooling around outside it.15

More alarming consequences include decreased sexual satisfaction in adolescents,16 the group you’d expect to be most ravished by the newfound joys of sex. Even more worrying is research has found a significant link between porn use and support for violence against women17 and sexually aggressive behaviors in men.18

Not to mention porn completely skews your perception of what beauty is and gives you unreasonable standards for sex with the women you meet. If you’ve ever gotten an otherwise beautiful girl naked in your bed and been unable to ignore the tiny blemishes or asymmetries to the point where you have trouble getting turned on, then you know what I mean.

Porn Diets—And Quitting Altogether

Chances are you’re not a porn addict, but if you’re a man under the age of 40, I imagine that the abundant access to porn has affected you more than you realize.

Think back to the first time you watched porn. The mere image of a beautiful naked woman was probably enough for you. But sadly, for many of us, over the years we devolve into darker and more twisted porn habits.

And worst of all, the younger you were when you began watching porn, the worse all of these effects generally are.

In my book on attracting women, I shared something I referred to as the “masturbation diet” in my chapter about motivation. It involved eliminating porn and limiting masturbation to 1-2 times per week.

The goal of the “diet” was to revitalize and motivate guys who had trouble being motivated enough to pursue women in the face of their anxiety. I had done it on and off in the past whenever I needed a kick in the ass and it worked for me. Often within a week or two. But I had never considered keeping it or making it a permanent habit in my life.

Then one year, the “no more porn” stuff really caught fire, and a number of men hopped on the bandwagon on my (now defunct) forum and agreed to not look at porn for 60 days. We all kept logs on the thread and it turned out to be a raging success. Most of us made it through the 60 days unscathed and became true believers. Porn had been negatively affecting our sex lives.

For some, it was a major shift and very difficult. For others, the changes were minor and simple. For everyone, the consensus seems to be we’re glad we did it.

Personally, I have been watching porn since I was 13, and had been watching it almost daily for 8-10 years when I began this challenge. This was my experience.

  • First two weeks

    I had somewhat intense cravings to watch porn. The cravings would come and go, often along with my sex drive. Some mood swings. And a few nights where I dreamt about pornography—no, not dreams about having sex, dreams about pornography. Yeah, fucked up.

    With my erratic sex drive, I’d go 4-5 days without masturbating, and then go nuts and do it 3-4 times in the span of 24 hours. Sometimes it felt like I was 16-years-old all over again. When I did masturbate, I made a point to only fantasize about girls I knew or had met, NOT about porn.

  • Week three to four

    My sex drive was high and remained that way. My assertiveness around women increased, as well as my confidence being sexual around them.

    I began to find normal, everyday girls to be more beautiful. Minor flaws and blemishes that used to bug me were now endearing and sometimes even sexy to me. Put simply: I became less of a scumbaggy “bro,” and more like a real, living, caring, empathic human being.

  • After one month

    I was having better sex. I was performing better and enjoying it more and wanting it more often.

    I had no temptation to watch porn and the benefits continued to increase throughout month two.

But then some time after the “no more porn” challenge, I was pulling 14-hour workdays and not getting out much, so I hit up the good old YouPorn to blow off some… err, steam.

Yeah, that’s it, blow off steam.

On my first return to porn post-challenge, a couple of things had changed:

  1. Porn I used to enjoy now felt excessive, dehumanizing, and honestly, not very attractive. There were a few videos I saw where I couldn’t believe I used to watch stuff like that.
  2. I couldn’t help but notice how unhappy and inauthentic the girls in the videos often were. Not to say I hadn’t noticed some of the actresses obviously faking their way through a scene in the past, but this was deeper. Like you could tell they just weren’t very happy people and didn’t have much self-respect. I know this both a) sounds weird to be thinking about while getting your fap on, and b) should not surprise anybody. But it actually became so apparent that it was hard for me to stay turned on in some cases.

So what does this mean? Is porn the devil? Should you never watch it? Is it ruining your sex life as we speak?

I can only answer for myself. For me, yes, porn had a noticeable impact on my sex life and I’m much better off not watching it. And I know there are a number of guys on the forum who had far more dramatic benefits than I did.

I will never go back to watching it regularly. I imagine I will watch it occasionally. But it’s clear that if I watch it on any consistent basis for more than a few days, it negatively affects my sex life. I honestly wish I had stopped watching it years ago, as it would have saved me a lot of struggle for motivation and embarrassment in the bedroom.

How to Quit Watching Porn

Some people, with a little intentional effort, find it pretty easy to quit watching porn. Others find it easy to quit at first and then struggle to stay off it. A few find it outright impossible.

If you believe you may suffer from porn addiction—you watch porn for up to an hour per session, you have trouble getting an erection without porn, or you watch porn which does not match your sexual orientation—then it’s time to do a full reboot.

The idea of the reboot comes from a site on quitting porn, YourBrainOnPorn.com. I highly recommend checking it out.

But the gist of the reboot is as follows:

1. Block All Porn Sites From Your Computer and Phone

This might sound a little extreme, and I know everyone thinks they should just be able to quit without using site blockers because, after all, we’re not children sneaking around our parents’ computer, right?

Look, I get it. But as I’ve written about before, your willpower is finite and your habits—and addictions—are ultimately products of your environment. So rather than using all your energy to resist temptation through brute willpower, take the time to set up an environment that primes you for success here.

Some people even block all images for a little while because it can be hard to not be assaulted with fleshy images on social media, ads, etc. These can be triggers for people that quickly lead to more intense cravings.

2. No Masturbation for at Least a Week

I didn’t do this with my porn diet, but this is apparently key for a lot of guys. Get your big head out of your little head so you can recharge and get a little perspective.

And if you’re so inclined, you might consider replacing your fap habit with a meditation habit. I’d stay away from tantric meditation though, at least at first…

3. Have Some Form of Support Where You Can Vent

I know that just made you squirm in your chair a little, but this is an incredibly common problem for guys. So 1) you’re not alone, and 2) it’s proven with basically any addictive type behavior that social support greatly increases your chances of success.19

The great thing about living in the internet age is you can do this anonymously on forums, take your pick.

4. Don’t Beat Yourself Up Over This

Again, a lot of guys have troubles with this. And by a lot, I mean like 80% of men have probably overdone it at least a few times when it comes to porn.

Also, I want to stress that I have no moral issues with porn and I don’t care what you do with your genitals in the privacy of your own home (this is also the philosophy at yourbrainonporn.com).

And if you relapse at any point, don’t sweat it too much. The point isn’t to be closer to perfection, it’s to live with more intention. Just because you have a few weak moments doesn’t make you a filthy pervert who has the self-control of an invalid nine-year-old.

It just means you’re human.

Footnotes

  1. Hilton, D. L. (2013). Pornography addiction–a supranormal stimulus considered in the context of neuroplasticity. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 3, 20767.
  2. Koukounas, E., & Over, R. (2000). Changes in the magnitude of the eyeblink startle response during habituation of sexual arousal. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 38(6), 573–584.
  3. Twohig, M. P., Crosby, J. M., & Cox, J. M. (2009). Viewing Internet Pornography: For Whom is it Problematic, How, and Why? Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity, 16(4), 253–266.
  4. Cavaglion, G. (2009). Cyber-porn Dependence: Voices of Distress in an Italian Internet Self-help Community. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction, 7(2), 295–310.
  5. Duffy, A., Dawson, D. L., & das Nair, R. (2016). Pornography Addiction in Adults: A Systematic Review of Definitions and Reported Impact. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 13(5), 760–777.
  6. Zitzman, S. T., & Butler, M. H. (2009). Wives’ Experience of Husbands’ Pornography Use and Concomitant Deception as an Attachment Threat in the Adult Pair-Bond Relationship. Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity, 16(3), 210–240.
  7. Cavaglion, G., & Rashty, E. (2010). Narratives of Suffering among Italian Female Partners of Cybersex and Cyber-Porn Dependents. Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity, 17(4), 270–287.
  8. Bergner, R. M., & Bridges, A. J. (2002). The Significance of Heavy Pornography Involvement for Romantic Partners: Research and Clinical Implications. Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, 28(3), 193–206.
  9. Kühn, S., & Gallinat, J. (2014). Brain Structure and Functional Connectivity Associated With Pornography Consumption: The Brain on Porn. JAMA Psychiatry.
  10. Stark, R., & Klucken, T. (2017). Neuroscientific Approaches to (Online) Pornography Addiction. In C. Montag & M. Reuter (Eds.), Internet Addiction: Neuroscientific Approaches and Therapeutical Implications Including Smartphone Addiction (pp. 109–124). Springer International Publishing.
  11. Love, T., Laier, C., Brand, M., Hatch, L., & Hajela, R. (2015). Neuroscience of Internet Pornography Addiction: A Review and Update. Behavioral Sciences, 5(3), 388–433.
  12. Stewart, D. N., & Szymanski, D. M. (2012). Young Adult Women’s Reports of Their Male Romantic Partner’s Pornography Use as a Correlate of Their Self-Esteem, Relationship Quality, and Sexual Satisfaction. Sex Roles, 67(5-6), 257–271.
  13. Schneider, J. P. (2000). A Qualitative Study of Cybersex Participants: Gender Differences, Recovery Issues, and Implications for Therapists. Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity, 7(4), 249–278.
  14. Lambert, N. M., Negash, S., Stillman, T. F., Olmstead, S. B., & Fincham, F. D. (2012). A love that doesn’t last: Pornography consumption and weakened commitment to one’s romantic partner. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 31(4), 410–438.
  15. Gwinn, A. M., Lambert, N. M., Fincham, F. D., & Maner, J. K. (2013). Pornography, Relationship Alternatives, and Intimate Extradyadic Behavior. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 4(6), 699–704.
  16. Peter, J., & Valkenburg, P. M. (2009). Adolescents’ Exposure to Sexually Explicit Internet Material and Sexual Satisfaction: A Longitudinal Study. Human Communication Research, 35(2), 171–194.
  17.  Hald, G. M., Malamuth, N. M., & Yuen, C. (2010). Pornography and attitudes supporting violence against women: Revisiting the relationship in nonexperimental studies. Aggressive Behavior, 36(1), 14–20.
  18. Malamuth, N. M., Addison, T., & Koss, M. (2000). Pornography and Sexual Aggression: Are There Reliable Effects and Can We Understand Them? Annual Review of Sex Research, 11(1), 26–91.
  19. See for example this study on the preventive role of social support in gambling addiction, and this one on internet addiction.

I <3 mindset ?

She was the only woman in the room… Again.

In businesses across the country, this young Black consultant would shake hands with CEOs and look around the boardroom. Where were the women? Where were the people of color?

That’s when Hattie Hill, a pioneer of diversity and equity in global business and today’s MarieTV guest, decided to take personal responsibility to empower women and fight for gender equality.

As Hattie says, “You can’t advocate if you’re not in the room.” Not only was she in the room, but she made an entrance

Even if this is your first introduction to Hattie, I guarantee her career has impacted your life.

Hattie spent more than 30 years working with businesses across 70 countries to implement diversity, inclusion, and gender equity strategies. She’s worked with nonprofits, foundations, and Fortune 500 companies including IBM and Southwest Airlines, and has fundamentally shifted how modern organizations approach diversity.


Don’t you ever say what you can’t do — until you try.  @EngageHattie
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Not to mention, Hattie’s been a world-changing CEO herself… twice.

She served as president and CEO of the Women’s Foodservice Forum and recently came out of retirement to head the T.D. Jakes Foundation, raising $100 million to boost economic growth in disadvantaged communities through science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM).

This woman is a treasure. She’s got wisdom, power, strength, and soul — and is here to show us the important role we play in creating a more equitable world.

Watch now and learn:

  • The #1 hang-up that holds women back in business — and how to get past it.
  • 9 tell-tale signs you’re doing too much.
  • Why now is the BEST time to be an entrepreneur.
  • Fired up about equality? What it really means to be an advocate.
  • How to care about someone without carrying their burden.
  • 3 simple words to guide you when the going gets tough.

If you’re ready to learn how “diversity and inclusion” can be more than just a buzzword, this episode is a must-watch.

View Transcript

Check out this episode on The Marie Forleo Podcast

Listen Now

DIVE DEEPER: Learn how to achieve your impossible dreams with Dr. Tererai Trent plus 12 ways to make your work meaningful.

Once you’ve watched, take a deep breath. It’s time to turn your insight into action!

As Hattie says, “When you stop and ask yourself, ‘Where can I make a difference?’ — that moment is magic.”

Let’s make this a magic moment.

In the comments below, tell us: What’s one insight, idea, or aha from this episode you can put into action today?

Remember, nothing changes unless we do.

Even when it seems small, every step toward a more equitable future matters.

When you hit the inevitable roadblocks? Or feel overwhelmed by the progress yet to be made? Remember what Hattie’s mama always told her: 

“Just keep living.”

XO

The post Gender Equality Hero: Hattie Hill on 30+ Years Empowering Women appeared first on .

Who else thinks method is cool ?

Does self-care ever feel overwhelming or like another thing on your to-do list? Maybe you feel like you desperately need self-care, but you’re never sure exactly what you need in the moment. This leads to a quick Google for “self-care ideas” which gives you a million suggestions that leave you feeling more stressed out than when you started.

Learn about the seven pillars of self-care and take the self-care quiz to see which type of self-care you need right now.

There’s a lot of information out there about self-care, and it’s a complex topic that only makes things more confusing. All you know is that you need to take care of yourself, but you’re not sure what that should look like.

I have a simple solution to avoid overwhelm: look at self-care in terms of seven pillars. Seven might sound like a lot, but once you know them, you can better recognize what needs work in your life instead of trying to do everything. Plus I’ve created a self-care quiz you can take to see which type of self-care you need right now!

Overview of the Pillars


The seven pillars of self-care work together to bring a sense of wholeness to your life. I previously wrote about the five dimensions of self-care in this post, but I’ve added two other elements because I felt like they were missing from the original list: recreational and environmental.

7 pillars of self-care

The pillars of self-care:

  1. Mental
  2. Emotional
  3. Physical
  4. Environmental
  5. Spiritual
  6. Recreational
  7. Social

How to use them:

Seeing this list might feel overwhelming. You might think you have to find some kind of perfect balance between them all.

You don’t need to focus on finding a perfect balance between them all. Instead, you might need to focus on one area for a day, a week, maybe even a month. When you’re ready, you can focus on others.

What’s most important is noticing which one area needs attention so that it doesn’t start dragging the other areas down with it.

Now that we’re a little less overwhelmed, let’s explore the pillars of self-care in more detail:

The 7 Pillars of Self-Care


1. Mental Self-Care

Mental self-care

Mental/intellectual self-care is about cultivating a healthy mindset through mindfulness and curiosity. Mental self-care is important for developing a healthy mindset, growing your skills, reducing stress, and enhancing your knowledge and creativity.

Examples of mental self-care:


2. Emotional Self-Care

Emotional self-care

Emotional self-care involves taking care of matters of the heart with healthy coping strategies and self-compassion. Tapping into emotional self-care helps you understand yourself more, better deal with challenges and setbacks, and develop healthy emotional responses.

Examples of emotional self-care:

  • Watching a deep movie
  • Listening to your favorite songs
  • Writing down positive affirmations
  • Asking for help when you need it
  • Setting boundaries to protect your time and energy

3. Physical Self-Care

Physical self-care

Physical self-care involves taking care of your body with exercise, nutrition, good hygiene, and proper sleep. When you practice activities for your physical well-being, you can increase your energy levels and boost your self-esteem.

Examples of physical self-care:

  • Eating meals at regular times (breakfast, lunch, and dinner)
  • Drinking more water
  • Taking vitamins daily
  • Getting 7-8 hours of sleep
  • Trying a new workout class or video (here’s a playlist)

4. Environmental Self-Care

Environmental self-care

Environmental self-care involves taking care of the spaces and places around you. The more you take care of your immediate environment, the more it will help you to thrive and feel a sense of belonging where you are.

Examples of environmental self-care:

  • Arranging your workspace to be more comfortable
  • Exploring somewhere new (even if it’s in your own town)
  • Decluttering your living space
  • Going outside for a walk
  • Appealing to your five senses (e.g. light a candle, adjust the lighting, put on comfortable clothes, sip a warm drink, and put on your favorite playlist)

5. Spiritual Self-Care

Spiritual self-care

Spiritual self-care involves taking care of your soul through activities or practices that provide a sense of purpose, direction, or meaning to your life. Dedicating time to spiritual self-care can help you find more meaning in life, feel more grounded, and develop a sense of belonging in life.

Examples of spiritual self-care:

  • Spending time in nature
  • Finding a community to contribute to (online or offline)
  • Identifying your values & what’s meaningful to you
  • Volunteering or contributing to a cause you believe in
  • Connecting to a higher power (whatever that means to you)

6. Recreational Self-Care

Recreational self-care

Recreational self-care involves taking care of your inner child with hobbies, fun activities, and new experiences. Recreation is important because it lets you get away from the pressure of your to-do list and simply enjoy the pleasures that life has to offer.

Examples of recreational self-care:

  • Taking time for hobbies and creative activities
  • Going on an adventure by yourself or with others
  • Taking time to do absolutely nothing (and enjoying it!)
  • Playing board or video games
  • Switching up your regular daily routine

7. Social Self-Care

Social self-care

Even though self-care is about you, it’s important to connect with other human beings on a regular basis. Social self-care means cultivating healthy relationships and connecting with people who get you. Seeking out positive social connections helps us create a sense of belonging and acceptance. 

Examples of social self-care:

  • Spending time with people whose company you enjoy
  • Calling or seeing your relatives
  • Writing a letter to a friend (pen-pal style!)
  • Talking to a support group
  • Chatting in an online forum or community

Which pillar do you need to focus on? Take the self-care quiz!

Self-care quiz

If you’re not sure which pillar of self-care you need most, take the self-care quiz to find out what to focus on first.

My hope is that this quiz will become a tool you use whenever you feel indecisive or unsure of the type of self-care you need. Come back to it whenever you need it!

Take this quiz here. Feel free to let me know your results in a comment below!

The post The 7 Pillars of Self-Care and How To Use Them appeared first on The Blissful Mind.

Stuff like this are why I love social media

She was the only woman in the room… Again.

In businesses across the country, this young Black consultant would shake hands with CEOs and look around the boardroom. Where were the women? Where were the people of color?

That’s when Hattie Hill, a pioneer of diversity and equity in global business and today’s MarieTV guest, decided to take personal responsibility to empower women and fight for gender equality.

As Hattie says, “You can’t advocate if you’re not in the room.” Not only was she in the room, but she made an entrance

Even if this is your first introduction to Hattie, I guarantee her career has impacted your life.

Hattie spent more than 30 years working with businesses across 70 countries to implement diversity, inclusion, and gender equity strategies. She’s worked with nonprofits, foundations, and Fortune 500 companies including IBM and Southwest Airlines, and has fundamentally shifted how modern organizations approach diversity.


Don’t you ever say what you can’t do — until you try.  @EngageHattie
Click To Tweet


Not to mention, Hattie’s been a world-changing CEO herself… twice.

She served as president and CEO of the Women’s Foodservice Forum and recently came out of retirement to head the T.D. Jakes Foundation, raising $100 million to boost economic growth in disadvantaged communities through science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM).

This woman is a treasure. She’s got wisdom, power, strength, and soul — and is here to show us the important role we play in creating a more equitable world.

Watch now and learn:

  • The #1 hang-up that holds women back in business — and how to get past it.
  • 9 tell-tale signs you’re doing too much.
  • Why now is the BEST time to be an entrepreneur.
  • Fired up about equality? What it really means to be an advocate.
  • How to care about someone without carrying their burden.
  • 3 simple words to guide you when the going gets tough.

If you’re ready to learn how “diversity and inclusion” can be more than just a buzzword, this episode is a must-watch.

View Transcript

Check out this episode on The Marie Forleo Podcast

Listen Now

DIVE DEEPER: Learn how to achieve your impossible dreams with Dr. Tererai Trent plus 12 ways to make your work meaningful.

Once you’ve watched, take a deep breath. It’s time to turn your insight into action!

As Hattie says, “When you stop and ask yourself, ‘Where can I make a difference?’ — that moment is magic.”

Let’s make this a magic moment.

In the comments below, tell us: What’s one insight, idea, or aha from this episode you can put into action today?

Remember, nothing changes unless we do.

Even when it seems small, every step toward a more equitable future matters.

When you hit the inevitable roadblocks? Or feel overwhelmed by the progress yet to be made? Remember what Hattie’s mama always told her: 

“Just keep living.”

XO

The post Gender Equality Hero: Hattie Hill on 30+ Years Empowering Women appeared first on .

such a great page

Does self-care ever feel overwhelming or like another thing on your to-do list? Maybe you feel like you desperately need self-care, but you’re never sure exactly what you need in the moment. This leads to a quick Google for “self-care ideas” which gives you a million suggestions that leave you feeling more stressed out than when you started.

Learn about the seven pillars of self-care and take the self-care quiz to see which type of self-care you need right now.

There’s a lot of information out there about self-care, and it’s a complex topic that only makes things more confusing. All you know is that you need to take care of yourself, but you’re not sure what that should look like.

I have a simple solution to avoid overwhelm: look at self-care in terms of seven pillars. Seven might sound like a lot, but once you know them, you can better recognize what needs work in your life instead of trying to do everything. Plus I’ve created a self-care quiz you can take to see which type of self-care you need right now!

Overview of the Pillars


The seven pillars of self-care work together to bring a sense of wholeness to your life. I previously wrote about the five dimensions of self-care in this post, but I’ve added two other elements because I felt like they were missing from the original list: recreational and environmental.

Learn about the seven pillars of self-care and take the self-care quiz to see which type of self-care you need right now.

The pillars of self-care:

  1. Mental
  2. Emotional
  3. Physical
  4. Environmental
  5. Spiritual
  6. Recreational
  7. Social

How to use them:

Seeing this list might feel overwhelming. You might think you have to find some kind of perfect balance between them all.

You don’t need to focus on finding a perfect balance between them all. Instead, you might need to focus on one area for a day, a week, maybe even a month. When you’re ready, you can focus on others.

What’s most important is noticing which one area needs attention so that it doesn’t start dragging the other areas down with it.

Now that we’re a little less overwhelmed, let’s explore the pillars of self-care in more detail:

The 7 Pillars of Self-Care


1. Mental Self-Care

Mental self-care

Mental/intellectual self-care is about cultivating a healthy mindset through mindfulness and curiosity. Mental self-care is important for developing a healthy mindset, growing your skills, reducing stress, and enhancing your knowledge and creativity.

Examples of mental self-care:


2. Emotional Self-Care

Emotional self-care

Emotional self-care involves taking care of matters of the heart with healthy coping strategies and self-compassion. Tapping into emotional self-care helps you understand yourself more, better deal with challenges and setbacks, and develop healthy emotional responses.

Examples of emotional self-care:

  • Watching a deep movie
  • Listening to your favorite songs
  • Writing down positive affirmations
  • Asking for help when you need it
  • Setting boundaries to protect your time and energy

3. Physical Self-Care

Physical self-care

Physical self-care involves taking care of your body with exercise, nutrition, good hygiene, and proper sleep. When you practice activities for your physical well-being, you can increase your energy levels and boost your self-esteem.

Examples of physical self-care:

  • Eating meals at regular times (breakfast, lunch, and dinner)
  • Drinking more water
  • Taking vitamins daily
  • Getting 7-8 hours of sleep
  • Trying a new workout class or video (here’s a playlist)

4. Environmental Self-Care

Environmental self-care

Environmental self-care involves taking care of the spaces and places around you. The more you take care of your immediate environment, the more it will help you to thrive and feel a sense of belonging where you are.

Examples of environmental self-care:

  • Arranging your workspace to be more comfortable
  • Exploring somewhere new (even if it’s in your own town)
  • Decluttering your living space
  • Going outside for a walk
  • Appealing to your five senses (e.g. light a candle, adjust the lighting, put on comfortable clothes, sip a warm drink, and put on your favorite playlist)

5. Spiritual Self-Care

Spiritual self-care

Spiritual self-care involves taking care of your soul through activities or practices that provide a sense of purpose, direction, or meaning to your life. Dedicating time to spiritual self-care can help you find more meaning in life, feel more grounded, and develop a sense of belonging in life.

Examples of spiritual self-care:

  • Spending time in nature
  • Finding a community to contribute to (online or offline)
  • Identifying your values & what’s meaningful to you
  • Volunteering or contributing to a cause you believe in
  • Connecting to a higher power (whatever that means to you)

6. Recreational Self-Care

Recreational self-care

Recreational self-care involves taking care of your inner child with hobbies, fun activities, and new experiences. Recreation is important because it lets you get away from the pressure of your to-do list and simply enjoy the pleasures that life has to offer.

Examples of recreational self-care:

  • Taking time for hobbies and creative activities
  • Going on an adventure by yourself or with others
  • Taking time to do absolutely nothing (and enjoying it!)
  • Playing board or video games
  • Switching up your regular daily routine

7. Social Self-Care

Social self-care

Even though self-care is about you, it’s important to connect with other human beings on a regular basis. Social self-care means cultivating healthy relationships and connecting with people who get you. Seeking out positive social connections helps us create a sense of belonging and acceptance. 

Examples of social self-care:

  • Spending time with people whose company you enjoy
  • Calling or seeing your relatives
  • Writing a letter to a friend (pen-pal style!)
  • Talking to a support group
  • Chatting in an online forum or community

Which pillar do you need to focus on? Take the self-care quiz!

Self-care quiz

If you’re not sure which pillar of self-care you need most, take the self-care quiz to find out what to focus on first.

My hope is that this quiz will become a tool you use whenever you feel indecisive or unsure of the type of self-care you need. Come back to it whenever you need it!

Take this quiz here. Feel free to let me know your results in a comment below!

The post The 7 Pillars of Self-Care and How To Use Them appeared first on The Blissful Mind.

Valuable Post

She was the only woman in the room… Again.

In businesses across the country, this young Black consultant would shake hands with CEOs and look around the boardroom. Where were the women? Where were the people of color?

That’s when Hattie Hill, a pioneer of diversity and equity in global business and today’s MarieTV guest, decided to take personal responsibility to empower women and fight for gender equality.

As Hattie says, “You can’t advocate if you’re not in the room.” Not only was she in the room, but she made an entrance

Even if this is your first introduction to Hattie, I guarantee her career has impacted your life.

Hattie spent more than 30 years working with businesses across 70 countries to implement diversity, inclusion, and gender equity strategies. She’s worked with nonprofits, foundations, and Fortune 500 companies including IBM and Southwest Airlines, and has fundamentally shifted how modern organizations approach diversity.


Don’t you ever say what you can’t do — until you try.  @EngageHattie
Click To Tweet


Not to mention, Hattie’s been a world-changing CEO herself… twice.

She served as president and CEO of the Women’s Foodservice Forum and recently came out of retirement to head the T.D. Jakes Foundation, raising $100 million to boost economic growth in disadvantaged communities through science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM).

This woman is a treasure. She’s got wisdom, power, strength, and soul — and is here to show us the important role we play in creating a more equitable world.

Watch now and learn:

  • The #1 hang-up that holds women back in business — and how to get past it.
  • 9 tell-tale signs you’re doing too much.
  • Why now is the BEST time to be an entrepreneur.
  • Fired up about equality? What it really means to be an advocate.
  • How to care about someone without carrying their burden.
  • 3 simple words to guide you when the going gets tough.

If you’re ready to learn how “diversity and inclusion” can be more than just a buzzword, this episode is a must-watch.

View Transcript

Check out this episode on The Marie Forleo Podcast

Listen Now

DIVE DEEPER: Learn how to achieve your impossible dreams with Dr. Tererai Trent plus 12 ways to make your work meaningful.

Once you’ve watched, take a deep breath. It’s time to turn your insight into action!

As Hattie says, “When you stop and ask yourself, ‘Where can I make a difference?’ — that moment is magic.”

Let’s make this a magic moment.

In the comments below, tell us: What’s one insight, idea, or aha from this episode you can put into action today?

Remember, nothing changes unless we do.

Even when it seems small, every step toward a more equitable future matters.

When you hit the inevitable roadblocks? Or feel overwhelmed by the progress yet to be made? Remember what Hattie’s mama always told her: 

“Just keep living.”

XO

The post Gender Equality Hero: Hattie Hill on 30+ Years Empowering Women appeared first on .