anyone love this post as much as i do

The Opportunity in Adversity

By Eckhart Tolle

Life unfolds between the polarities of order and chaos. It is important at this time to recognize these two fundamental opposites, without which the world could not even be. Another word for disorder is “adversity.” When it becomes more extreme, we might call it “chaos.”

We would prefer, of course, to have order in our lives, which means to have things going well. We would like relative harmony in our lives. Yet, that very often is marred by the eruption of some form of disorder. And, usually, we resent that—we get angry, or despondent, or sad.

Disorder comes in many, many forms, big and small. When disorder comes it usually creates a kind of havoc in our lives, accompanied by strong underlying beliefs. “There’s something very wrong, this should not be happening, maybe God is against me,” and so on. Again, we need to understand that disorder, or adversity, is inevitable and is an essential part of a higher order.

 From a higher perspective, a higher level, the existence of order and disorder, or order and chaos, is a necessary part of the evolution of life.

 Many people have found that they experience a deepening, or a deeper sense of self or beingness, immediately after and as a result of having endured a period of disorder or chaos. This is sometimes called “the dark night of the soul,” a term from medieval Christianity used to describe the mental breakdown that many mystics experienced prior to awakening spiritually. There was an eruption of disorder, of destruction. Then, out of that, a deeper realization arose.

 And although that can be very painful, the strange thing is, it’s precisely there that many humans experience a transcendence. A strange fact is that it almost never happens that people awaken spiritually while they’re in their comfort zone. Or that they become deeper as human beings, which would be a partial awakening. It almost never happens. The place where the evolutionary shift happens, or the evolutionary leap, is usually the experience of disorder in a person’s life.

And so your life then moves between order and disorder. You have both, and they’re both necessary. There’s no guarantee that when disorder erupts this will bring about an awakening or a deepening, but there’s always the possibility. It is an opportunity, but often, it is missed.

 So here we are at this time, and our mission is the same: to align with the present moment, with whatever is happening here and now. The upheaval that we’re experiencing at the present time probably will not be the last upheaval that’s going to come on a collective level. However, it is an opportunity—because although this is a time for upheavals, it is also a time for awakening. The two go together. Just as in an individual life, you need adversity to awaken. It’s an opportunity but not a guarantee. And so what looks tragic and unpleasant on a conventional level is actually perfectly fine and as it should be on a higher level; it would not be happening otherwise. It’s all part of the awakening of human beings and of planetary awakening.

To learn more about Eckhart’s teachings on Conscious Manifestation, click here.

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The post The Opportunity in Adversity appeared first on Eckhart Tolle | Official Site – Spiritual Teachings and Tools For Personal Growth and Happiness.

anyone else like mindset as much as i do

Ever wish you’d wake up one day and a brilliant business idea would strike you like a flash of lightning?

It could happen. But, sometimes inspiration shows up more like… a bee sting.

That’s what happened to Mikaila Ulmer, 15-year old social entrepreneur, bee ambassador, and author of Bee Fearless: Dream Like a Kid.

At age 4½, two painful bee stings and a recipe from Granny Helen prompted Mikaila to learn more about bees and launch her first lemonade stand. Since then, she’s turned Me & the Bees Lemonade into a socially-conscious business, landed an investment with Daymond John on Shark Tank, sold over 1 million bottles in 1800 stores, started a bee nonprofit, and even fist-bumped Barack Obama while serving her lemonade at the White House.


Don't be discouraged by life's little stings. Get back up and spread your wings. @MikailasBees
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Today, she’s on MarieTV to show you how to start a business at any age — even if you’re nervous and have no idea what you’re doing. If you’ve ever wondered whether you have what it takes to be an entrepreneur, or if your idea is good enough, today’s episode is a must-watch.

You’ll learn:

4:10 — What it took for Mikaila to earn her first dollar.
5:29 — Got kids? Tips to help your children follow their dreams.
8:03 — The #1 key ingredient to succeed in anything.
18:50 — Mikaila’s “Face-On-The-Bottle Secret” to handle criticism without crumbling.
21:15 — The Shark Tank Story: How she landed a deal with Daymond John.
24:17 — How to turn big disappointment into even bigger success.
32:10 — Advice for starting a business at any age.

Whether you’re a business owner, aspiring entrepreneur, or just want to make a difference in the world, Mikaila’s here to prove you can do anything you set your mind to. Sit back and let this brilliant 15-year-old inspire you to get started.

Hit play to watch now or listen on The Marie Forleo Podcast.

View Transcript

Check out this episode on The Marie Forleo Podcast

Listen Now

DIVE DEEPER: Why Daymond John thinks you should stop waiting for your lucky break and how to build a meaningful business.

Do you have a business idea, cause you believe in, or change you’d like to see in the world?

Leave a comment below to be the spark of inspiration for others. Share your purpose-driven idea or an aha-moment from this episode, and how you plan to turn your insight into action.

Important: share your thoughts and ideas directly in the comments. Links to other posts, videos, etc. will be removed.

Don’t worry if your dream seems impossible right now. As Mikaila so beautifully says, “I know that if we all go out in this world looking at the possibilities of things instead of just the problems, our future will be a whole lot brighter.”

With all my love and a lemonade toast,

XO 

The post What Kids Can Teach Us About Starting a Business with Mikaila Ulmer appeared first on .

Nice post thanks a lot I really love self-improvement

Have you ever convinced yourself to do something in the name of #self-care? Watched an entire season of a Friends in one day? It was self-care! 

Let’s be real, we’ve all been there. The trouble is that it’s often hard to know whether you’re actually practicing self-care or simply being lazy.

Rest is SO important and I often talk about letting yourself take breaks, but it’s difficult to know sometimes if you actually need a break or if you need to push through and get things done.

For example, exercise is an important element of physical self-care. If you have a workout scheduled but you’ve had a stressful day and feel like taking a break, is it because your body truly needs a rest or because you’re trying to avoid working out? Of course, nothing bad is going to happen if you miss a day, but you may benefit more if you just do the workout. 

There’s a difference between self-care, self-soothing, self-indulgence, and laziness – and it’s important to be clear on what these things look like for you. Otherwise, you might be sabotaging yourself by finding excuses NOT to take care of yourself when you actually need self-care in your life.

In this post, I’m sharing some tips to help you distinguish between self-care, self-soothing, self-indulgence, and old fashioned laziness. If you’ve struggled to know whether you’ve been taking care of yourself or sabotaging yourself, this post is for you.

Let’s Talk About Self-Sabotage


Doing things in the name of #selfcare has become increasingly popular, but are you actually practicing self-care or just sabotaging yourself? Here’s how to tell if something is self-care or self-sabotage.

What is self-sabotage?

Self-sabotage is getting in the way of your own success. Rather than external circumstances preventing you from reaching your goals, it means you’re doing things that are stopping you from reaching those goals.

One of the best explanations for why we self-sabotage comes from Gay Hendricks’s book, The Big Leap. Hendricks describes that we all have limits to how much love, success, and creativity we will let ourselves enjoy.

When you’re on the verge of a breakthrough, you might fall back into old habits. You might try to push yourself back into your comfort zone when something feels difficult or uncertain (even when you feel like a good change is coming).

Related Post: 5 Signs You’re Dealing With Self-Sabotage


How does self-sabotage show up in self-care?

Self-care is so important for protecting your time and energy, but it loses its effectiveness when you start to call everything self-care.

Unless you’re clear on YOUR definition of self-care, you can end up convincing yourself that anything is fair game.

At its core, self-care involves activities and practices we engage in on a regular basis to reduce stress and enhance our well-being.

Here are some examples:

Self-sabotage means doing the opposite of the thing you need. You might talk yourself out of self-care and convince yourself that you don’t need it right now or that you need to focus on work instead.

Even knowing this, it’s difficult to identify which actions are self-care or self-sabotage in disguise. Let’s talk about how you can tell the difference.

Related Post: The Unspoken Complexity of “Self-Care” by Deanna Zandt

Types of Perceived Self-Care


Doing things in the name of #selfcare has become increasingly popular, but are you actually practicing self-care or just sabotaging yourself? Here’s how to tell if something is self-care or self-sabotage.

We can call anything self-care if we really want to, but here are some common terms that people often use interchangeably with self-care:

Self-Soothing

Self-soothing (or self-pampering) involves little to no exertion from you that makes you feel better in some way. It may act as a sense of escape, especially if you’ve had a stressful day. For example, getting a manicure or watching Netflix. You might feel relaxed by these activities, but they’re not necessarily going to help you find balance or become a healthier person.

Now, self-soothing is not frivolous or unimportant. It’s good to relax! But it’s important to know when you’re self-soothing rather than practicing self-care.

Self-Indulgence

There’s also self-indulgence which involves excessive or unrestrained gratification of one’s desires. Self-indulgence is a “treat yo self” mentality. There’s nothing wrong with treating yourself once in a while, but self-indulgence is not true self-care (remember, self-care is about regular practices and habits whereas self-indulgence is better in small doses).

Laziness

Then we have good old fashioned laziness. Laziness is the quality of being unwilling to work or use your energy to do something. An example of this would be putting off a task (especially related to self-care) because you don’t feel like it.

Is laziness okay? If you’re avoiding something, not exactly. Doing nothing doesn’t always mean you’re being lazy. If you’re being intentional with relaxation, it can serve you well. You’re allowed to veg out and give your mind and body a break.

“Self-care only works if you’re actually caring for yourself and not just letting yourself off the hook.”Hannah Jack

Choosing Self-Care


Doing things in the name of #selfcare has become increasingly popular, but are you actually practicing self-care or just sabotaging yourself? Here’s how to tell if something is self-care or self-sabotage.

In order to know if you’re in need of true self-care, you have to listen to yourself and make the choice to do what is best for you. Your mind will try to trick you into doing what’s easiest (which is often the lazy route). That’s why awareness is key.

Everything comes down to awareness. What classifies something as self-care is ultimately the intention behind it, so you have to be aware of your own intentions.

Here are some questions to help you become more aware of your intentions when making decisions around self-care:

  • Am I making this decision to escape or avoid something?
  • Will this choice help to reduce my stress levels?
  • Am I trying to disconnect from myself?
  • Will this choice enhance my well-being?
  • Will my future self thank me or suffer later because of my actions now?
  • Am I letting my head get in the way of doing what I really need?
  • Would I be able to do the things that I need to do more effectively if I a) rest now or b) work now and rest later?
  • Am I going to feel better by doing this thing? Am I going to feel worse?

Remember, awareness is key. Slow down and ask yourself if what you’re doing is self-improving or self-defeating. When given the chance, choose the option that enhances your well-being.


How do you tell the difference between self-care and self-sabotage?

I hope this post has helped you to identify what self-care looks like in your own life. Here are some more posts to help you on your self-care journey:

Related Posts:

The post Self-Care or Self-Sabotage? How To Tell The Difference appeared first on The Blissful Mind.

Thanks

By Leo Babauta

For anyone trying to do meaningful work, feeling connected to that meaning can be a big challenge.

It turns out, even if you can stay focused on your meaningful work for most of the day … it’s easy to lose connection to why it’s meaningful. To why you care about doing this in the first place.

We get stuck in the drudgery of doing endless meaningless tasks, stuck in task mode, rather than feeling that the tasks are meaningful ways to spend our day.

So how do we deal with this challenge? Not surprisingly, the answer is practice.

Let’s take a look.

Have a Deeper Why

If you haven’t done this step yet, don’t skip it. We need to find a deeper reason to do our work, other than, “To get paid,” or “Because it’s on my list or in my inbox,” or “Because other people are waiting for me to do it.”

If we don’t have a deeper reason, work becomes meaningless drudgery. We can put up with it for years, but it won’t feel like a meaningful way to spend our lives. It won’t feel inspired.

So why do you care about doing what you do?

What makes this meaningful to you?

There are lots of possible answers … here are a few:

  • Because you’re helping people you care about
  • To make a change in the world that feels powerful
  • To help people who are struggling or in pain
  • To preserve something you care about
  • To protect or serve your loved ones
  • It’s an act of love for yourself or others

In my experience, the most meaningful reasons to do anything are to serve others, out of love. But sometimes, we have to start by loving ourselves — that’s incredibly meaningful as well.

So get clear on your Why. Feel connected to it.

Set Rituals to Connect with Meaning

It turns out, just knowing why something is meaningful isn’t enough — we tend to forget it as soon as we get into Doing mode.

And so having points during your day when you connect to your meaning is a good idea. Create some rituals that will remind you to practice feeling connected.

Some simple examples:

  • A short 2-5 minute meditation in the morning or evening, where you visualize the people you care about, and practice connecting to their hearts
  • A devotional practice on your yoga mat, or in front of an altar, where you think about the struggles of the people you’re helping, and devote your work to them
  • A photo, Buddha statue, vase of flowers, candle — some object that will remind you to pause and practice feeling connected to your Why
  • A short moment of pause, where you set intentions before you start writing or answering messages (for example) — intentions of serving people you care about

What rituals would you like to create to connect to your meaning?

Practice Connecting to Meaning

Rituals are structure in our lives to help us remember to feel connected to meaning … but they won’t really do anything if we just go through the motions.

We have to practice really feeling the meaning.

So how do we do that? For me, it’s about feeling it in my heart. I practice feeling the love and devotion for the people I care about (all of you!), picturing any difficulties, struggle, pain or fear that you might have, and wishing you all happiness. Basically, a version of lovingkindness meditation, aimed specifically at the people I’m trying to serve.

I practice standing as Love, in my being. I practice feeling compassion in my heart. I practice feeling devotion to those I care deeply about, in my core. And then I see what flows from that — writing an article like this, recording a video, sending an email or message.

I practice trying to reconnect to that feeling as I’m writing or doing the task. I’ll forget, and lose connection, over and over again. That’s OK — it’s not about being perfect. It’s about coming back to meaning, over and over.

Because it makes every single thing I do so much more meaningful. Because it infuses my life with meaning. This is an inspired life! I wish you nothing less.

Who else? <3method

By Leo Babauta

For anyone trying to do meaningful work, feeling connected to that meaning can be a big challenge.

It turns out, even if you can stay focused on your meaningful work for most of the day … it’s easy to lose connection to why it’s meaningful. To why you care about doing this in the first place.

We get stuck in the drudgery of doing endless meaningless tasks, stuck in task mode, rather than feeling that the tasks are meaningful ways to spend our day.

So how do we deal with this challenge? Not surprisingly, the answer is practice.

Let’s take a look.

Have a Deeper Why

If you haven’t done this step yet, don’t skip it. We need to find a deeper reason to do our work, other than, “To get paid,” or “Because it’s on my list or in my inbox,” or “Because other people are waiting for me to do it.”

If we don’t have a deeper reason, work becomes meaningless drudgery. We can put up with it for years, but it won’t feel like a meaningful way to spend our lives. It won’t feel inspired.

So why do you care about doing what you do?

What makes this meaningful to you?

There are lots of possible answers … here are a few:

  • Because you’re helping people you care about
  • To make a change in the world that feels powerful
  • To help people who are struggling or in pain
  • To preserve something you care about
  • To protect or serve your loved ones
  • It’s an act of love for yourself or others

In my experience, the most meaningful reasons to do anything are to serve others, out of love. But sometimes, we have to start by loving ourselves — that’s incredibly meaningful as well.

So get clear on your Why. Feel connected to it.

Set Rituals to Connect with Meaning

It turns out, just knowing why something is meaningful isn’t enough — we tend to forget it as soon as we get into Doing mode.

And so having points during your day when you connect to your meaning is a good idea. Create some rituals that will remind you to practice feeling connected.

Some simple examples:

  • A short 2-5 minute meditation in the morning or evening, where you visualize the people you care about, and practice connecting to their hearts
  • A devotional practice on your yoga mat, or in front of an altar, where you think about the struggles of the people you’re helping, and devote your work to them
  • A photo, Buddha statue, vase of flowers, candle — some object that will remind you to pause and practice feeling connected to your Why
  • A short moment of pause, where you set intentions before you start writing or answering messages (for example) — intentions of serving people you care about

What rituals would you like to create to connect to your meaning?

Practice Connecting to Meaning

Rituals are structure in our lives to help us remember to feel connected to meaning … but they won’t really do anything if we just go through the motions.

We have to practice really feeling the meaning.

So how do we do that? For me, it’s about feeling it in my heart. I practice feeling the love and devotion for the people I care about (all of you!), picturing any difficulties, struggle, pain or fear that you might have, and wishing you all happiness. Basically, a version of lovingkindness meditation, aimed specifically at the people I’m trying to serve.

I practice standing as Love, in my being. I practice feeling compassion in my heart. I practice feeling devotion to those I care deeply about, in my core. And then I see what flows from that — writing an article like this, recording a video, sending an email or message.

I practice trying to reconnect to that feeling as I’m writing or doing the task. I’ll forget, and lose connection, over and over again. That’s OK — it’s not about being perfect. It’s about coming back to meaning, over and over.

Because it makes every single thing I do so much more meaningful. Because it infuses my life with meaning. This is an inspired life! I wish you nothing less.