Anything related to this is so important

What comes to mind when you hear the word “self-sabotage”? After all, everyone does that to some extent. We like what’s familiar. We want comfort and harmony.  Some of us develop quite the arsenal of self-sabotaging behaviors, though. And if your life is less than what you’d like it to be, chances are you’re in …

Read MoreSelf-Sabotaging Behavior: Why You Do It And How To Stop

The post Self-Sabotaging Behavior: Why You Do It And How To Stop appeared first on Live Bold and Bloom.

Who else thinks self-improvement is cool ?

Dream of making more money, having more flexibility, AND doing work that matters?

Sounds like time to be your own boss.

If you’ve ever thought about starting your own business, but are worried it’s not the right time or you might not have what it takes, today’s MarieTV will change your mind. In this live roundtable discussion, you’ll hear from four inspiring grads who had the business itch and used B-School to make it happen — even during a global pandemic.

Like the 64,000+ other entrepreneurs who’ve gone through B-School, these grads are real people working in a variety of industries.

They are not special snowflakes or superhuman.

They have families, kids, responsibilities, challenges, and have lived through the same pandemic, economic crisis, and political upheaval as the rest of us. None of it stopped them from growing profitable, purposeful businesses with B-School.

If you dream of starting your own business and wonder if B-School is right for you, don’t miss this LIVE MarieTV roundtable discussion.

These four inspiring souls will remind you that the world really does need that special gift that only you have.

To learn more about B-School and check out the free training series, visit us here. But hurry, doors close Thursday!

The post These 4 B-School Grads Built Thriving Businesses — During A Global Pandemic appeared first on .

posts about mindset are why everyone loves facebook

By Leo Babauta

In this chaotic world, we worry, we avoid, we try so hard to “do it right.”

At the heart of it, all of that worry and anxiety is because we cannot trust.

We don’t trust others: we judge them and try to tell them how to live their lives, we get frustrated with them when they don’t do things the way we think they should.

We don’t trust ourselves: we avoid saying things because we don’t think we can handle it if they get upset, we try to get things just right because we don’t think we can handle failure or being judged.

We don’t trust the world, so we’re constantly anxious about it all.

There’s nothing wrong with that — we’re human. We’re wired to see threats everywhere.

But what would it be like to practice trust?

Trust others to live their lives. When we’re frustrated with them or judging them, we can remind ourselves to practice trusting them, remind ourselves that we can’t control everyone’s behavior nor do we really know for sure how anyone else should act. Heck, I don’t even know for sure how I should act!

Trust myself to deal with whatever happens. Pandemic, lockdowns, political strife, all kinds of difficulty has come our way, and we are surviving. Trust myself to handle whatever chaos arrives, whatever failure might happen, whatever difficulty comes.

What would it be like, to practice this kind of surrender and trust?

The post The Practice of Trust appeared first on zen habits.

Important Info !

The Opportunity in Adversity

By Eckhart Tolle

Life unfolds between the polarities of order and chaos. It is important at this time to recognize these two fundamental opposites, without which the world could not even be. Another word for disorder is “adversity.” When it becomes more extreme, we might call it “chaos.”

We would prefer, of course, to have order in our lives, which means to have things going well. We would like relative harmony in our lives. Yet, that very often is marred by the eruption of some form of disorder. And, usually, we resent that—we get angry, or despondent, or sad.

Disorder comes in many, many forms, big and small. When disorder comes it usually creates a kind of havoc in our lives, accompanied by strong underlying beliefs. “There’s something very wrong, this should not be happening, maybe God is against me,” and so on. Again, we need to understand that disorder, or adversity, is inevitable and is an essential part of a higher order.

 From a higher perspective, a higher level, the existence of order and disorder, or order and chaos, is a necessary part of the evolution of life.

 Many people have found that they experience a deepening, or a deeper sense of self or beingness, immediately after and as a result of having endured a period of disorder or chaos. This is sometimes called “the dark night of the soul,” a term from medieval Christianity used to describe the mental breakdown that many mystics experienced prior to awakening spiritually. There was an eruption of disorder, of destruction. Then, out of that, a deeper realization arose.

 And although that can be very painful, the strange thing is, it’s precisely there that many humans experience a transcendence. A strange fact is that it almost never happens that people awaken spiritually while they’re in their comfort zone. Or that they become deeper as human beings, which would be a partial awakening. It almost never happens. The place where the evolutionary shift happens, or the evolutionary leap, is usually the experience of disorder in a person’s life.

And so your life then moves between order and disorder. You have both, and they’re both necessary. There’s no guarantee that when disorder erupts this will bring about an awakening or a deepening, but there’s always the possibility. It is an opportunity, but often, it is missed.

 So here we are at this time, and our mission is the same: to align with the present moment, with whatever is happening here and now. The upheaval that we’re experiencing at the present time probably will not be the last upheaval that’s going to come on a collective level. However, it is an opportunity—because although this is a time for upheavals, it is also a time for awakening. The two go together. Just as in an individual life, you need adversity to awaken. It’s an opportunity but not a guarantee. And so what looks tragic and unpleasant on a conventional level is actually perfectly fine and as it should be on a higher level; it would not be happening otherwise. It’s all part of the awakening of human beings and of planetary awakening.

To learn more about Eckhart’s teachings on Conscious Manifestation, click here.

Join for free and receive upcoming articles, teachings, special announcements, and more.

The post The Opportunity in Adversity appeared first on Eckhart Tolle | Official Site – Spiritual Teachings and Tools For Personal Growth and Happiness.

Anything about self-improvement is so important

I think you’ll agree that we’re all seeking a fulfilling life. Those late nights searching for your life’s purpose? We’ve all been there. We want to wake up happy and spend our days feeling satisfied, yet that’s rarely the case. It’s hard to feel fulfilled sometimes.

The funny thing is that when something feels off in life, our reaction is often to add more to our plates. We take on more because it means more excitement and less boredom, right?

Life doesn't have to be filled to the brim to be fulfilling. Here’s how I learned that true fulfillment is about doing less, not more.

After burning out in 2019, I learned that this isn’t always the case. I realized that I cannot keep taking on more simply because I feel unfulfilled. Truthfully, there’s fulfillment to be found in doing fewer things. In this post, I’m sharing why you don’t need to fill your life to the brim with activities and plans to make it fulfilling.

Why a full life doesn’t equal fulfillment


When you think of a “full life”, you might immediately think of travel, parties, and experiencing new things (many of the things we can’t do in the state of the world right now). Somehow that’s become the vision of what it means to live a fulfilling life.

But life doesn’t have to be brimming with activities to be satisfying. You don’t have to fill every moment of the day with something to do because you think it will make you more content. I say that, yet I’ve adopted the opposite mindset for most of my life.

In college, I juggled my coursework, a student job, sorority, editing the sociology magazine, being a note-taker, mentoring students, and maintaining friendships and a relationship. Looking back on it, I’m not sure how on earth I managed to do that.

Life doesn't have to be filled to the brim to be fulfilling. Here’s how I learned that true fulfillment is about doing less, not more.

Then again in 2019, I thought working three jobs would make my life more rewarding. All it did was stress me out (and this is coming from someone with decent time management skills).

That year taught me that I cannot keep overscheduling myself. I realized that I needed to lower my self-expectations and be okay with doing a few things instead of every.single.thing.

I think I took on so much because I didn’t want people to think I was lazy. Or maybe it was because I didn’t want to think of myself as lazy. All it really did was make me feel like I was continually chasing my tail.

Forcing life to be “full” can lead to less fulfillment. In fact, a busy life can prevent you from being present most of the time. If you don’t have a chance to slow down and pause sometimes, it’s hard to appreciate the moment you’re in.

Related Post: Feel Like You’re Not Doing Enough? Read This.

If you don’t have a chance to slow down and pause sometimes, it’s hard to appreciate the moment you’re in.

What fulfillment really looks like


I’m not saying that life should be empty, but it doesn’t need to be go-go-go to be fulfilling. A fulfilling life can be quiet and unassuming.

As I write this post now, I’m in the moment; I’m sitting at my desk, listening to music, and letting my thoughts unfold. I could think of so many other things I need or want to do, but I’m enjoying this as it is. This moment is nothing special, but it’s so very special at the same time. 

Life doesn't have to be filled to the brim to be fulfilling. Here’s how I learned that true fulfillment is about doing less, not more.

It might not sound exciting, but maybe that’s why we get hung up on the concept of fulfillment. We assume fulfilling means exciting, but sometimes it’s simple, calm, and understated. 

We also get stuck when we think we need to feel fulfilled every second of the day. If you don’t feel fulfilled all the time, it doesn’t mean you’re doing anything wrong.

Fulfillment is a balancing act between moments of joy and moments of stillness. One of the hardest things is learning to be okay with this duality of life.

Fulfillment is a balancing act between moments of joy and moments of stillness.

You don’t have to rush to add new things to your life when you feel unfulfilled. Perhaps you need to reduce or remove instead. After all, it’s better to do a few things extraordinarily well than many things in a mediocre fashion.

Often we can find more fulfillment simply by paying attention. Notice every now and again when you feel a sense of calm. When you’re going for a walk, notice how you put one foot in front of the other without thinking about it. Sometimes that in itself is enough to amaze me and bring me a sense of contentment.

Related Post: 5 Tips To Pause Hustle Mode And Slow Down


What does a fulfilling life mean to you?

I hope this post has given you something to think about when it comes to making your own life fulfilling. Remember that what’s fulfilling to others may not be fulfilling to you. Listen to what you want, and try not to get distracted by what everyone else is doing.

If this post resonated with you, I’d love if you shared it with someone who might enjoy it!

The post Why A “Full Life” Isn’t The Key To Fulfillment (And What I’m Focusing On Instead) appeared first on The Blissful Mind.

I always love anything like this

I think you’ll agree that we’re all seeking a fulfilling life. Those late nights searching for your life’s purpose? We’ve all been there. We want to wake up happy and spend our days feeling satisfied, yet that’s rarely the case. It’s hard to feel fulfilled sometimes.

The funny thing is that when something feels off in life, our reaction is often to add more to our plates. We take on more because it means more excitement and less boredom, right?

Life doesn't have to be filled to the brim to be fulfilling. Here’s how I learned that true fulfillment is about doing less, not more.

After burning out in 2019, I learned that this isn’t always the case. I realized that I cannot keep taking on more simply because I feel unfulfilled. Truthfully, there’s fulfillment to be found in doing fewer things. In this post, I’m sharing why you don’t need to fill your life to the brim with activities and plans to make it fulfilling.

Why a full life doesn’t equal fulfillment


When you think of a “full life”, you might immediately think of travel, parties, and experiencing new things (many of the things we can’t do in the state of the world right now). Somehow that’s become the vision of what it means to live a fulfilling life.

But life doesn’t have to be brimming with activities to be satisfying. You don’t have to fill every moment of the day with something to do because you think it will make you more content. I say that, yet I’ve adopted the opposite mindset for most of my life.

In college, I juggled my coursework, a student job, sorority, editing the sociology magazine, being a note-taker, mentoring students, and maintaining friendships and a relationship. Looking back on it, I’m not sure how on earth I managed to do that.

Life doesn't have to be filled to the brim to be fulfilling. Here’s how I learned that true fulfillment is about doing less, not more.

Then again in 2019, I thought working three jobs would make my life more rewarding. All it did was stress me out (and this is coming from someone with decent time management skills).

That year taught me that I cannot keep overscheduling myself. I realized that I needed to lower my self-expectations and be okay with doing a few things instead of every.single.thing.

I think I took on so much because I didn’t want people to think I was lazy. Or maybe it was because I didn’t want to think of myself as lazy. All it really did was make me feel like I was continually chasing my tail.

Forcing life to be “full” can lead to less fulfillment. In fact, a busy life can prevent you from being present most of the time. If you don’t have a chance to slow down and pause sometimes, it’s hard to appreciate the moment you’re in.

Related Post: Feel Like You’re Not Doing Enough? Read This.

If you don’t have a chance to slow down and pause sometimes, it’s hard to appreciate the moment you’re in.

What fulfillment really looks like


I’m not saying that life should be empty, but it doesn’t need to be go-go-go to be fulfilling. A fulfilling life can be quiet and unassuming.

As I write this post now, I’m in the moment; I’m sitting at my desk, listening to music, and letting my thoughts unfold. I could think of so many other things I need or want to do, but I’m enjoying this as it is. This moment is nothing special, but it’s so very special at the same time. 

Life doesn't have to be filled to the brim to be fulfilling. Here’s how I learned that true fulfillment is about doing less, not more.

It might not sound exciting, but maybe that’s why we get hung up on the concept of fulfillment. We assume fulfilling means exciting, but sometimes it’s simple, calm, and understated. 

We also get stuck when we think we need to feel fulfilled every second of the day. If you don’t feel fulfilled all the time, it doesn’t mean you’re doing anything wrong.

Fulfillment is a balancing act between moments of joy and moments of stillness. One of the hardest things is learning to be okay with this duality of life.

Fulfillment is a balancing act between moments of joy and moments of stillness.

You don’t have to rush to add new things to your life when you feel unfulfilled. Perhaps you need to reduce or remove instead. After all, it’s better to do a few things extraordinarily well than many things in a mediocre fashion.

Often we can find more fulfillment simply by paying attention. Notice every now and again when you feel a sense of calm. When you’re going for a walk, notice how you put one foot in front of the other without thinking about it. Sometimes that in itself is enough to amaze me and bring me a sense of contentment.

Related Post: 5 Tips To Pause Hustle Mode And Slow Down


What does a fulfilling life mean to you?

I hope this post has given you something to think about when it comes to making your own life fulfilling. Remember that what’s fulfilling to others may not be fulfilling to you. Listen to what you want, and try not to get distracted by what everyone else is doing.

If this post resonated with you, I’d love if you shared it with someone who might enjoy it!

The post Why A “Full Life” Isn’t The Key To Fulfillment (And What I’m Focusing On Instead) appeared first on The Blissful Mind.

Stuff about self-improvement are why everyone loves facebook

I think you’ll agree that we’re all seeking a fulfilling life. Those late nights searching for your life’s purpose? We’ve all been there. We want to wake up happy and spend our days feeling satisfied, yet that’s rarely the case. It’s hard to feel fulfilled sometimes.

The funny thing is that when something feels off in life, our reaction is often to add more to our plates. We take on more because it means more excitement and less boredom, right?

Life doesn't have to be filled to the brim to be fulfilling. Here’s how I learned that true fulfillment is about doing less, not more.

After burning out in 2019, I learned that this isn’t always the case. I realized that I cannot keep taking on more simply because I feel unfulfilled. Truthfully, there’s fulfillment to be found in doing fewer things. In this post, I’m sharing why you don’t need to fill your life to the brim with activities and plans to make it fulfilling.

Why a full life doesn’t equal fulfillment


When you think of a “full life”, you might immediately think of travel, parties, and experiencing new things (many of the things we can’t do in the state of the world right now). Somehow that’s become the vision of what it means to live a fulfilling life.

But life doesn’t have to be brimming with activities to be satisfying. You don’t have to fill every moment of the day with something to do because you think it will make you more content. I say that, yet I’ve adopted the opposite mindset for most of my life.

In college, I juggled my coursework, a student job, sorority, editing the sociology magazine, being a note-taker, mentoring students, and maintaining friendships and a relationship. Looking back on it, I’m not sure how on earth I managed to do that.

Life doesn't have to be filled to the brim to be fulfilling. Here’s how I learned that true fulfillment is about doing less, not more.

Then again in 2019, I thought working three jobs would make my life more rewarding. All it did was stress me out (and this is coming from someone with decent time management skills).

That year taught me that I cannot keep overscheduling myself. I realized that I needed to lower my self-expectations and be okay with doing a few things instead of every.single.thing.

I think I took on so much because I didn’t want people to think I was lazy. Or maybe it was because I didn’t want to think of myself as lazy. All it really did was make me feel like I was continually chasing my tail.

Forcing life to be “full” can lead to less fulfillment. In fact, a busy life can prevent you from being present most of the time. If you don’t have a chance to slow down and pause sometimes, it’s hard to appreciate the moment you’re in.

Related Post: Feel Like You’re Not Doing Enough? Read This.

If you don’t have a chance to slow down and pause sometimes, it’s hard to appreciate the moment you’re in.

What fulfillment really looks like


I’m not saying that life should be empty, but it doesn’t need to be go-go-go to be fulfilling. A fulfilling life can be quiet and unassuming.

As I write this post now, I’m in the moment; I’m sitting at my desk, listening to music, and letting my thoughts unfold. I could think of so many other things I need or want to do, but I’m enjoying this as it is. This moment is nothing special, but it’s so very special at the same time. 

Life doesn't have to be filled to the brim to be fulfilling. Here’s how I learned that true fulfillment is about doing less, not more.

It might not sound exciting, but maybe that’s why we get hung up on the concept of fulfillment. We assume fulfilling means exciting, but sometimes it’s simple, calm, and understated. 

We also get stuck when we think we need to feel fulfilled every second of the day. If you don’t feel fulfilled all the time, it doesn’t mean you’re doing anything wrong.

Fulfillment is a balancing act between moments of joy and moments of stillness. One of the hardest things is learning to be okay with this duality of life.

Fulfillment is a balancing act between moments of joy and moments of stillness.

You don’t have to rush to add new things to your life when you feel unfulfilled. Perhaps you need to reduce or remove instead. After all, it’s better to do a few things extraordinarily well than many things in a mediocre fashion.

Often we can find more fulfillment simply by paying attention. Notice every now and again when you feel a sense of calm. When you’re going for a walk, notice how you put one foot in front of the other without thinking about it. Sometimes that in itself is enough to amaze me and bring me a sense of contentment.

Related Post: 5 Tips To Pause Hustle Mode And Slow Down


What does a fulfilling life mean to you?

I hope this post has given you something to think about when it comes to making your own life fulfilling. Remember that what’s fulfilling to others may not be fulfilling to you. Listen to what you want, and try not to get distracted by what everyone else is doing.

If this post resonated with you, I’d love if you shared it with someone who might enjoy it!

The post Why A “Full Life” Isn’t The Key To Fulfillment (And What I’m Focusing On Instead) appeared first on The Blissful Mind.