I think anything about mindset are fab

Over the past few months, I’ve been working on being consistent with a few habits to take care of myself throughout quarantine. These are habits that help me avoid “doomscrolling”, get enough sleep, and keep my body moving even when I want to lay on the couch all day.

My struggle with habits is staying consistent and not getting bored. I often talk myself out of being consistent because I think, “Aren’t habits supposed to be fun?” before I’ve even started them.

The easiest way to make self-care stick is through routine and daily habits. Here are 5 self-care habits for your daily routine.

In reality, habits don’t have to be fun. That’s not to say they should make you miserable, but your habits won’t always feel exciting.

I recently finished the book Atomic Habits by James Clear, and it gave me a lot of perspective on how I can be more consistent with my habits. 

Clear says, “Successful people feel the same lack of motivation as everyone else. The difference is that they still find a way to show up despite the feelings of boredom.”

This quote made me realize that boredom is okay. Once you push past the thoughts that tell you it’s going to be hard, it’s often not as bad as you imagined.

5 self-care habits for your daily routine


The easiest way to make self-care stick is through routine and daily habits. Here are 5 self-care habits for your daily routine.

I’m a firm believer that self-care shouldn’t feel like an escape from your life. True self-care should be part of your lifestyle, and the easiest way to make that happen is with your habits and routines.

I’ll admit that I haven’t 100% mastered these, but here are the self-care habits I’m working on right now:

1. Go outside first thing in the morning

Getting sunshine in the morning can help balance your body’s internal clock and make it easier to fall asleep at night, according to SleepFoundation.org. I go for a walk in the afternoon almost every day, but I’ve recently started walking in the morning a few days a week (check out my reel on Instagram here to see my current morning routine).

As winter approaches, it is getting colder and it’s usually raining (good ol’ Seattle for you). Because of that, I don’t know how long I’ll be able to keep up this habit of going outside first thing.

I’ve been thinking about getting a light therapy lamp to help with that. If you’ve had any success with those, leave a comment and let me know!


2. Follow a work-start ritual

Something I learned from Atomic Habits is that the easiest way to get into a habit is to make the first two minutes easy. I try to start my workday by writing, but that often feels daunting as the first step in my routine. What’s easy is making a cup of tea, lighting a candle, and putting on a calm playlist.

The first two minutes of my ritual signal that it’s time to start writing. No matter how hard the writing actually is (it’s often not as hard as I make it out to be), the work-start ritual is easy and calming. 


3. Avoid caffeine after 10 am

Did you know it can take 5-6 hours for half of the caffeine you consume to leave your system? That means if you drink a cup of coffee at 1 pm, it’s probably still going to be in your system if you try to go to sleep at 10 pm. These days, I’ve been drinking green tea with breakfast and then having a cup of English breakfast tea around 9:45 am. I pretty much only drink caffeine-free tea after that.


4. Keep work and self-care spaces separate

It’s been really tempting to work from the couch when I’m at home all day, but it wreaks havoc on my back. Because of that, I’ve made sure I start my workday from my desk. If I want to move to the couch later in the day, that’s fine, but my new rule is that I can’t start the day from the couch.

Related Post: How To Balance Productivity and Rest When You Work From Home


5. Wind-down without screens an hour before bed

A habit I’ve implemented after reading the book The Power of When is creating a wind-down ritual at 10:30 pm. I *try* to spend the last hour without screens, but it usually turns into the last 30 minutes before bed.

Author Michael Breus recommends spending the first 20 minutes of your wind-down routine getting ready for tomorrow, the next 20 minutes for hygiene habits like brushing your teeth, and the last 20 minutes for a calming habit like reading, stretching, or meditating. This structure is something I often forget to do, but I like the breakdown of the wind-down hour so I thought I’d share it.


What are your daily self-care habits?

I hope this post has given you some ideas for adding some calm self-care habits into your routine. I encourage you to find comfort in your habits and try to stay consistent even when it feels tough.

Leave a comment below! What do your daily habits look like right now?


Disclaimer: This post includes affiliate links, which means I will earn a commission if you make a purchase through these links. There is no additional cost to you.

The post 5 Self-Care Habits For Your Daily Routine appeared first on The Blissful Mind.

anyone else love this post as much as i do

The English philosopher Bertrand Russell once said, “The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts.”

Perhaps what’s even more amazing is that he said this long before the advent of the internet.

Today, due to the joys of social media, we are regularly exposed to legions of people who believe they know what the fuck they are talking about when they do not. And, indeed, as Russell pointed out, the more clueless these people are, the more confident in their pronouncements they seem to be.

It turns out that Russell’s axiom has been studied and the data back it up. People who are bad at something do believe they are good at it, and people who are good at it do believe they are bad at it. Amateurs are overconfident and experts are underconfident. Newbies believe they’ve got it all figured out and the weathered veterans understand that nothing is really known for sure.

In psychology, this is known as the “Dunning-Kruger Effect.” It’s a psychological tendency named after the two researchers who initially measured it. And it’s surprising how wide its applications are in our lives.

The Dunning-Kruger Effect: Ignorance of Ignorance

There are four types of information:

  • Known knowns

    Information you know you understand. (e.g., how to ride a bike.)
  • Known unknowns

    Information you know you don’t understand. (e.g., quantum physics.)
  • Unknown knowns

    Information that you know, but you didn’t realize that you knew it. Bonus! (e.g., we didn’t realize we instinctively knew how to be a parent until it happened.)
  • Unknown unknowns

    Information that you’re completely oblivious to. Not only do you not know it, you don’t even know that you don’t know it.

The unknown unknowns are where the Dunning-Kruger effect comes into play in the worst way. It’s our tendency to overestimate our own knowledge/skills/competence and underestimate our own ignorance.1

The Dunning-Kruger Effect goes beyond ignorance. It presents a meta-layer of ignorance—the ignorance of our own ignorance.

It’s one thing to make a mistake and then realize you did so because you just didn’t know any better. But it’s next-level shitbaggery to make a mistake and not even know it and then continue to believe you never made a mistake because you’re awesome.2

That is the Dunning-Kruger Effect. And that is what Russell says is so wrong with the world. The fact that we all do this. That we predictably overestimate our knowledge and abilities in a way that causes more errors and graver mistakes.

For example:

  • Gun owners who think they’re highly knowledgeable about gun safety score the lowest on tests of gun safety.3
  • Medical lab workers—the people who process samples for medical test results—who rate themselves as highly competent in their jobs are actually the worst at their jobs.4
  • Elderly people who think they’re better drivers than most are actually four times more likely to make unsafe driving errors.5
  • The lowest performing college students dramatically overestimate their performance on exams6 and their general knowledge in their area of study.7
  • The lowest performers in a debate competition wildly overestimated how well they did. They thought they’d won 59% of their contests when they actually only won 22% of them. 8

Yeah, but Mark, You Don’t Get It… I Really Am Awesome

Now, I know what you probably did when you read through that list. It’s probably the same thing I did.

“Psh, those other people are soooo dumb. Good thing I know about all of the ways I’m terrible at things… which means that the things I’m amazing at, I actually am pretty amazing.” 

We read things like this and at no point do we stop to consider the areas where we think we are great are also delusional. We fail to consider that we also fall victim to this blindspot.

Yet we do… oh, we do.

Just one example: we have blindspots when it comes to our emotional awareness. We might project our own bullshit onto other people, misplace our anger and judgement, shut down when we get uncomfortable, overcompensate for feelings of inferiority, let our jealousy get the best of us, be an insensitive prick without even realizing we’re being an insensitive prick, and so on. We all do it. All of us.

But some of us think we don’t do it nearly as much or as poorly as others. And yet, studies have shown that people who rank lowest on objective emotional intelligence tests think they’re far more emotionally aware than others.9 And it gets worse. These same people were more reluctant to listen to feedback about their scores and—AND—were much less likely to express interest in resources that would help them improve their emotional intelligence. Go figure.

The Dunning-Kruger effect - a man with a bag over his head

And it’s not just with emotions, it’s with… well, everything.

People with the unhealthiest lifestyle habits rate themselves as comparatively healthier than they actually are.10

People who score poorly on cognitive reasoning and analytical thinking tests severely overestimate their cognitive and analytical abilities.11 Meanwhile, the people who score highly underestimate their performance.

People who hold the most politically biased views also hold the most inaccurate “factual” beliefs. They wildly over or underestimate numbers related to things like welfare participation and government budget expenditures.12

So here we are, trapped in a universe where the people who need the most help not only refuse it, they refuse to even believe they need help in the first place.

Are we just totally fucked? Or is there a way out?

The Paradox of Overcoming Ignorance

Perhaps the most frustrating thing about the Dunning-Kruger effect is that it’s incredibly difficult to overcome. And that’s because it’s wrapped in contradiction.

How do you get someone—or yourself—to look for something they can’t even see? How do you correct an error if you don’t even know you made one?

This is the paradox of trying to overcome our own ignorance: The very thing that would help us see our mistakes is the same thing that would keep us from making them in the first place.

You can’t reason with a conspiracy theorist precisely because they didn’t form their beliefs with reason. Had they the ability to change their beliefs based on reason and evidence, they wouldn’t have believed in wild conspiracy theories in the first place. In fact, they think they’re the only ones being reasonable to begin with.

Part of the problem is that there is comfort in the feeling of knowing. People don’t like uncertainty. And so settling on a belief helps us feel like we’ve made more sense of the world. When we can make sense of the world, we feel safe. Whether that belief is true or not doesn’t matter—it just has to give us some relief from the anxiety of not knowing.

Maybe there’s a backdoor way to infiltrate our stuck minds and unfuck them somehow. Research suggests it’s sorta-kinda-maybe possible.

Getting people to focus on developing related skills, rather than assessing their own abilities, seems to have some effect in reducing the Dunning-Kruger effect in task performance.13

For example, if someone is terrible at accounting but doesn’t realize it, perhaps you teach them organization skills so that in the process of learning how to better organize paperwork and transactions, they come to realize that they are the world’s worst accountant.

It also might be effective to simply teach people about the concept of blindspots and the Dunning-Kruger Effect to begin with and then let the idea percolate in their minds for a while until they start questioning their own assumptions.14

Also, as much as you’d like to be a dick to some of these people, it turns out it’s not helpful to ridicule them for how stupid they are.15 Ridiculing people simply causes them to become more defensive and double-down on their challenged beliefs, not relinquish them.

That said, you can gently peer pressure someone into seeing their ignorance. Try showing them examples of top performers in whatever field they’re so overly confident about.16 This might or might not work depending on how delusional the person is, but it’s worth a shot.

In the end, though, I think the only way to ward off our own ignorance is by choosing to have fewer opinions and more loosely held beliefs.

Humility is an important value. In fact, the Dunning-Kruger Effect suggests that humility can be highly practical. By intentionally underestimating our understanding of things, not only do we open up more opportunities to learn and grow, but we also foster a more realistic view of ourselves, and prevent ourselves from looking like a narcissistic assface around others.

That is… until we decide that we are the most humble person you’ve ever met. Nobody is more humble than me. I’m so much more humble than everybody else…

…and now we’re back to square one.

Footnotes

  1. Dunning, D. (2011). The Dunning-Kruger effect: On being ignorant of one’s own ignorance. In J. M. Olson & M. P. Zanna (Eds.), Advances in Experimental Social Psychology (Vol. 44, pp. 247–296). Academic Press.
  2. In psychology, this is known as the “double burden” of ignorance.
  3. Ehrlinger, J., Johnson, K., Banner, M., Dunning, D., & Kruger, J. (2008). Why the unskilled are unaware: Further explorations of (absent) self-insight among the incompetent. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 105(1), 98–121.
  4. Haun, D. E., Zeringue, A., Leach, A., & Foley, A. (2000). Assessing the Competence of Specimen-Processing Personnel. Laboratory Medicine, 31(11), 633–637.
  5. Freund, B., Colgrove, L. A., Burke, B. L., & McLeod, R. (2005). Self-rated driving performance among elderly drivers referred for driving evaluation. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 37(4), 613–618.
  6. One study found that the poorest students thought they scored in the top 40% of their class when they actually scored in the bottom 15%. See: Ehrlinger, J., Johnson, K., Banner, M., Dunning, D., & Kruger, J. (2008). Why the unskilled are unaware: Further explorations of (absent) self-insight among the incompetent. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 105(1), 98–121.
  7. This includes a wide range of fields from medicine, nursing, biology, psychology, engineering, business, law, education, and management information systems. See: Mahmood, K. (2016). Do People Overestimate Their Information Literacy Skills? A Systematic Review of Empirical Evidence on the Dunning-Kruger Effect. Communications in Information Literacy, 10(2), 199.
  8. Ehrlinger, J., Johnson, K., Banner, M., Dunning, D., & Kruger, J. (2008). Why the unskilled are unaware: Further explorations of (absent) self-insight among the incompetent. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 105(1), 98–121.
  9. Sheldon, O. J., Dunning, D., & Ames, D. R. (2014). Emotionally unskilled, unaware, and uninterested in learning more: Reactions to feedback about deficits in emotional intelligence. Journal of Applied Psychology, 99(1), 125–137.
  10. Miller, J. E., Windschitl, P. D., Treat, T. A., & Scherer, A. M. (2019). Unhealthy and unaware? Misjudging social comparative standing for health-relevant behavior. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 85, 103873.
  11. Pennycook, G., Ross, R. M., Koehler, D. J., & Fugelsang, J. A. (2017). Dunning–Kruger effects in reasoning: Theoretical implications of the failure to recognize incompetence. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 24(6), 1774–1784.
  12. Kuklinski, J. H., Quirk, P. J., Jerit, J., Schwieder, D., & Rich, R. F. (2000). Misinformation and the Currency of Democratic Citizenship. The Journal of Politics, 62(3), 790–816.
  13. Kruger, J., & Dunning, D. (1999). Unskilled and Unaware of It: How Difficulties in Recognizing One’s Own Incompetence Lead to Inflated Self-Assessments. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 77(6), 1121–1134.
  14. You know, like I’m doing right now.
  15. Sheldon, O. J., Dunning, D., & Ames, D. R. (2014). Emotionally unskilled, unaware, and uninterested in learning more: Reactions to feedback about deficits in emotional intelligence. Journal of Applied Psychology, 99(1), 125–137.
  16. Miller, J. E., Windschitl, P. D., Treat, T. A., & Scherer, A. M. (2019). Unhealthy and unaware? Misjudging social comparative standing for health-relevant behavior. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 85, 103873.

Amazing very informative

The Opportunity in Adversity

By Eckhart Tolle

Life unfolds between the polarities of order and chaos. It is important at this time to recognize these two fundamental opposites, without which the world could not even be. Another word for disorder is “adversity.” When it becomes more extreme, we might call it “chaos.”

We would prefer, of course, to have order in our lives, which means to have things going well. We would like relative harmony in our lives. Yet, that very often is marred by the eruption of some form of disorder. And, usually, we resent that—we get angry, or despondent, or sad.

Disorder comes in many, many forms, big and small. When disorder comes it usually creates a kind of havoc in our lives, accompanied by strong underlying beliefs. “There’s something very wrong, this should not be happening, maybe God is against me,” and so on. Again, we need to understand that disorder, or adversity, is inevitable and is an essential part of a higher order.

 From a higher perspective, a higher level, the existence of order and disorder, or order and chaos, is a necessary part of the evolution of life.

 Many people have found that they experience a deepening, or a deeper sense of self or beingness, immediately after and as a result of having endured a period of disorder or chaos. This is sometimes called “the dark night of the soul,” a term from medieval Christianity used to describe the mental breakdown that many mystics experienced prior to awakening spiritually. There was an eruption of disorder, of destruction. Then, out of that, a deeper realization arose.

 And although that can be very painful, the strange thing is, it’s precisely there that many humans experience a transcendence. A strange fact is that it almost never happens that people awaken spiritually while they’re in their comfort zone. Or that they become deeper as human beings, which would be a partial awakening. It almost never happens. The place where the evolutionary shift happens, or the evolutionary leap, is usually the experience of disorder in a person’s life.

And so your life then moves between order and disorder. You have both, and they’re both necessary. There’s no guarantee that when disorder erupts this will bring about an awakening or a deepening, but there’s always the possibility. It is an opportunity, but often, it is missed.

 So here we are at this time, and our mission is the same: to align with the present moment, with whatever is happening here and now. The upheaval that we’re experiencing at the present time probably will not be the last upheaval that’s going to come on a collective level. However, it is an opportunity—because although this is a time for upheavals, it is also a time for awakening. The two go together. Just as in an individual life, you need adversity to awaken. It’s an opportunity but not a guarantee. And so what looks tragic and unpleasant on a conventional level is actually perfectly fine and as it should be on a higher level; it would not be happening otherwise. It’s all part of the awakening of human beings and of planetary awakening.

To learn more about Eckhart’s teachings on Conscious Manifestation, click here.

Join for free and receive upcoming articles, teachings, special announcements, and more.

The post The Opportunity in Adversity appeared first on Eckhart Tolle | Official Site – Spiritual Teachings and Tools For Personal Growth and Happiness.

More stuff on method please like = agree

The Opportunity in Adversity

By Eckhart Tolle

Life unfolds between the polarities of order and chaos. It is important at this time to recognize these two fundamental opposites, without which the world could not even be. Another word for disorder is “adversity.” When it becomes more extreme, we might call it “chaos.”

We would prefer, of course, to have order in our lives, which means to have things going well. We would like relative harmony in our lives. Yet, that very often is marred by the eruption of some form of disorder. And, usually, we resent that—we get angry, or despondent, or sad.

Disorder comes in many, many forms, big and small. When disorder comes it usually creates a kind of havoc in our lives, accompanied by strong underlying beliefs. “There’s something very wrong, this should not be happening, maybe God is against me,” and so on. Again, we need to understand that disorder, or adversity, is inevitable and is an essential part of a higher order.

 From a higher perspective, a higher level, the existence of order and disorder, or order and chaos, is a necessary part of the evolution of life.

 Many people have found that they experience a deepening, or a deeper sense of self or beingness, immediately after and as a result of having endured a period of disorder or chaos. This is sometimes called “the dark night of the soul,” a term from medieval Christianity used to describe the mental breakdown that many mystics experienced prior to awakening spiritually. There was an eruption of disorder, of destruction. Then, out of that, a deeper realization arose.

 And although that can be very painful, the strange thing is, it’s precisely there that many humans experience a transcendence. A strange fact is that it almost never happens that people awaken spiritually while they’re in their comfort zone. Or that they become deeper as human beings, which would be a partial awakening. It almost never happens. The place where the evolutionary shift happens, or the evolutionary leap, is usually the experience of disorder in a person’s life.

And so your life then moves between order and disorder. You have both, and they’re both necessary. There’s no guarantee that when disorder erupts this will bring about an awakening or a deepening, but there’s always the possibility. It is an opportunity, but often, it is missed.

 So here we are at this time, and our mission is the same: to align with the present moment, with whatever is happening here and now. The upheaval that we’re experiencing at the present time probably will not be the last upheaval that’s going to come on a collective level. However, it is an opportunity—because although this is a time for upheavals, it is also a time for awakening. The two go together. Just as in an individual life, you need adversity to awaken. It’s an opportunity but not a guarantee. And so what looks tragic and unpleasant on a conventional level is actually perfectly fine and as it should be on a higher level; it would not be happening otherwise. It’s all part of the awakening of human beings and of planetary awakening.

To learn more about Eckhart’s teachings on Conscious Manifestation, click here.

Join for free and receive upcoming articles, teachings, special announcements, and more.

The post The Opportunity in Adversity appeared first on Eckhart Tolle | Official Site – Spiritual Teachings and Tools For Personal Growth and Happiness.

Anything about method is important

WorkFromHoome

If you could go back in time and give advice to yourself right before the pandemic hit, what would you say?

Here’s my answer. Let’s assume it’s January 2020, just as we’re beginning to hear news about a strange virus in Wuhan, China…

Welcome to the beginning of the strangest year the modern world has ever known. You don’t realize it now, but life as you know it is about to change drastically.

Remember how you’ve been talking to everyone about “working from anywhere” for the past decade? Well, now the entire workforce will be leaving their offices and telecommuting. One problem: they can’t actually go anywhere. Working remotely usually implies freedom, but in this case it points to constraint. Simply put, the workforce is working remotely because it’s not safe to work together.

Most of the world’s borders will have closed, though if you want to visit the Maldives, you can buy an unlimited pass to a luxury hotel for all of 2021.

So that’s what you’re looking at! Let’s make a plan. Making plans is something you’re good at.

STEP 1: LOGISTICS.

First things first, buy stock in Zoom and Tesla. Pretty soon the whole world will be using Zoom, even kids in elementary school. “I think you’re muted” will be the new “Can you hear me now?” No one knows why Tesla’s stock keeps rising, but buy it anyway.

Next, start wearing a mask sooner rather than later. Wash your hands frequently, and stop touching your face ten times an hour. Oh, and forget about that forty-city tour you’ve been planning for six months. It’s not going to happen this year.

STEP 2: LET GO.

This time will be unlike anything you’ve experienced. Weirdly, it will be unlike anything that anyone has experienced.

You might feel disconcerted or worried. You won’t understand why other people don’t feel the way you do. You’ll be mad at the people who say it’s all a hoax, and frustrated at the ones who are so afraid that they let it affect every part of their lives. At times, you’ll feel more or less optimistic, but these times won’t always coincide with how other people feel.

You’ll try to see it as an opportunity. Lots of “we’ll get through this together” posts and articles will be published, some even by you. Collectively, you’ll cheer on healthcare workers from balconies.

All of this will be in April. But then comes May, June, July, August, September…

STEP 3: LET GO MORE.

Okay, fine, you think. We’ve all had to struggle through this, but now we’re ready to get off the train. It’s time!

But it doesn’t stop. A bizarre class conflict breaks out over whether or not we should take measures to reduce the number of people getting sick. Meanwhile, 400,000 people ride motorcycles to South Dakota. What could go wrong?

It’s hard to relate to the statistics you hear. Well over a million people are dead from something almost no one thought anything about when the year started.

Then you’ll go into winter with higher numbers than before. It’s discouraging, no doubt, but you’re starting to hope again. There are vaccines on the way.

Is it dangerous to hope? Time will tell, but either way, you still have a next step. Your next step, once again, is to use this time to improve yourself.

SoapTrust

STEP 4: RESOLVE TO BE BETTER

Yes, hope is on the way, just as it usually is. Some countries are already distributing these vaccines, and it seems it’s just a matter of time. We will once again be able to have concerts and conferences and hugs with strangers, at least the strangers we want to hug.

The goal now is to see it through. Remain vigilant, but don’t put your entire life on hold. Be cautious but not afraid.

Stay tough during the holidays and do whatever you can to find moments of joy. Put yourself first, and you’ll end up being a better support to others.

All the while, keep your head down and work on something to share with the world in 2021.

It really will come to an end! Hang in there, everyone.

###

anyone like this as much as i do

The Opportunity in Adversity

By Eckhart Tolle

Life unfolds between the polarities of order and chaos. It is important at this time to recognize these two fundamental opposites, without which the world could not even be. Another word for disorder is “adversity.” When it becomes more extreme, we might call it “chaos.”

We would prefer, of course, to have order in our lives, which means to have things going well. We would like relative harmony in our lives. Yet, that very often is marred by the eruption of some form of disorder. And, usually, we resent that—we get angry, or despondent, or sad.

Disorder comes in many, many forms, big and small. When disorder comes it usually creates a kind of havoc in our lives, accompanied by strong underlying beliefs. “There’s something very wrong, this should not be happening, maybe God is against me,” and so on. Again, we need to understand that disorder, or adversity, is inevitable and is an essential part of a higher order.

 From a higher perspective, a higher level, the existence of order and disorder, or order and chaos, is a necessary part of the evolution of life.

 Many people have found that they experience a deepening, or a deeper sense of self or beingness, immediately after and as a result of having endured a period of disorder or chaos. This is sometimes called “the dark night of the soul,” a term from medieval Christianity used to describe the mental breakdown that many mystics experienced prior to awakening spiritually. There was an eruption of disorder, of destruction. Then, out of that, a deeper realization arose.

 And although that can be very painful, the strange thing is, it’s precisely there that many humans experience a transcendence. A strange fact is that it almost never happens that people awaken spiritually while they’re in their comfort zone. Or that they become deeper as human beings, which would be a partial awakening. It almost never happens. The place where the evolutionary shift happens, or the evolutionary leap, is usually the experience of disorder in a person’s life.

And so your life then moves between order and disorder. You have both, and they’re both necessary. There’s no guarantee that when disorder erupts this will bring about an awakening or a deepening, but there’s always the possibility. It is an opportunity, but often, it is missed.

 So here we are at this time, and our mission is the same: to align with the present moment, with whatever is happening here and now. The upheaval that we’re experiencing at the present time probably will not be the last upheaval that’s going to come on a collective level. However, it is an opportunity—because although this is a time for upheavals, it is also a time for awakening. The two go together. Just as in an individual life, you need adversity to awaken. It’s an opportunity but not a guarantee. And so what looks tragic and unpleasant on a conventional level is actually perfectly fine and as it should be on a higher level; it would not be happening otherwise. It’s all part of the awakening of human beings and of planetary awakening.

To learn more about Eckhart’s teachings on Conscious Manifestation, click here.

Join for free and receive upcoming articles, teachings, special announcements, and more.

The post The Opportunity in Adversity appeared first on Eckhart Tolle | Official Site – Spiritual Teachings and Tools For Personal Growth and Happiness.

Who else loves mindset ?

WorkFromHoome

If you could go back in time and give advice to yourself right before the pandemic hit, what would you say?

Here’s my answer. Let’s assume it’s January 2020, just as we’re beginning to hear news about a strange virus in Wuhan, China…

Welcome to the beginning of the strangest year the modern world has ever known. You don’t realize it now, but life as you know it is about to change drastically.

Remember how you’ve been talking to everyone about “working from anywhere” for the past decade? Well, now the entire workforce will be leaving their offices and telecommuting. One problem: they can’t actually go anywhere. Working remotely usually implies freedom, but in this case it points to constraint. Simply put, the workforce is working remotely because it’s not safe to work together.

Most of the world’s borders will have closed, though if you want to visit the Maldives, you can buy an unlimited pass to a luxury hotel for all of 2021.

So that’s what you’re looking at! Let’s make a plan. Making plans is something you’re good at.

STEP 1: LOGISTICS.

First things first, buy stock in Zoom and Tesla. Pretty soon the whole world will be using Zoom, even kids in elementary school. “I think you’re muted” will be the new “Can you hear me now?” No one knows why Tesla’s stock keeps rising, but buy it anyway.

Next, start wearing a mask sooner rather than later. Wash your hands frequently, and stop touching your face ten times an hour. Oh, and forget about that forty-city tour you’ve been planning for six months. It’s not going to happen this year.

STEP 2: LET GO.

This time will be unlike anything you’ve experienced. Weirdly, it will be unlike anything that anyone has experienced.

You might feel disconcerted or worried. You won’t understand why other people don’t feel the way you do. You’ll be mad at the people who say it’s all a hoax, and frustrated at the ones who are so afraid that they let it affect every part of their lives. At times, you’ll feel more or less optimistic, but these times won’t always coincide with how other people feel.

You’ll try to see it as an opportunity. Lots of “we’ll get through this together” posts and articles will be published, some even by you. Collectively, you’ll cheer on healthcare workers from balconies.

All of this will be in April. But then comes May, June, July, August, September…

STEP 3: LET GO MORE.

Okay, fine, you think. We’ve all had to struggle through this, but now we’re ready to get off the train. It’s time!

But it doesn’t stop. A bizarre class conflict breaks out over whether or not we should take measures to reduce the number of people getting sick. Meanwhile, 400,000 people ride motorcycles to South Dakota. What could go wrong?

It’s hard to relate to the statistics you hear. Well over a million people are dead from something almost no one thought anything about when the year started.

Then you’ll go into winter with higher numbers than before. It’s discouraging, no doubt, but you’re starting to hope again. There are vaccines on the way.

Is it dangerous to hope? Time will tell, but either way, you still have a next step. Your next step, once again, is to use this time to improve yourself.

SoapTrust

STEP 4: RESOLVE TO BE BETTER

Yes, hope is on the way, just as it usually is. Some countries are already distributing these vaccines, and it seems it’s just a matter of time. We will once again be able to have concerts and conferences and hugs with strangers, at least the strangers we want to hug.

The goal now is to see it through. Remain vigilant, but don’t put your entire life on hold. Be cautious but not afraid.

Stay tough during the holidays and do whatever you can to find moments of joy. Put yourself first, and you’ll end up being a better support to others.

All the while, keep your head down and work on something to share with the world in 2021.

It really will come to an end! Hang in there, everyone.

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