Great love self-improvement

What are some good mantras to use in the morning to give your day an early boost? And what exactly is a morning meditation mantra, anyway?  You know the value of meditation as a daily habit. But your mind wanders so much, from the beginning and throughout your meditation time, you’d like some help setting …

Read More52 Uplifting Morning Mantras To Power Start To Your Day

The post 52 Uplifting Morning Mantras To Power Start To Your Day appeared first on Live Bold and Bloom.

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lilies

With Spring and Easter around the corner, there’s one thing your home may be missing—Easter Lilies.

Around this time of year, you can find these flowers in nearby grocery stores, farmers’ markets, and flower shops. The beautiful, white flower blooms in time for the Christian holiday of Easter, where it represents purity and rebirth.

Although Easter lilies are perfect to spruce up your home, this flower has specific care. Keep reading to understand how to care for Easter lilies!

History of the Easter Lily

The Bible, allegorical tales, and ancient fables all mention lilies and their pure properties of rebirth. The Biblelilies mentions that beautiful lilies often popped up where Christ’s sweat dripped off of him. Along with symbolizing Christ’s tears, there are other references to the lily in the Bible.

To celebrate Easter, many churches adorn their altars with lilies to symbolize the resurrection, or “rebirth,” of Christ.

This flower embodies much more than a beautiful centerpiece. Easter Lilies symbolize the rebirth of Christ celebrated during Easter, and the hope that it gives to families.

The lily ranks as America’s fourth most popular plotted plant, which is an ode to how beautiful it truly is.

How to Choose Your Easter Lilies

Easter lilies are usually yellow, pink, or white in color depending on the variety of the lily.

When choosing your lily, you want one that isn’t in full bloom but displays both buds and blooms so your lilies continue to grow and bloom. To get the most out of your lily’s shelf life, choose one that has a straight stem and green foliage. The darker the green the foliage is, the healthier the plant.

After deciding if it’s aesthetically pleasing, double-check to make sure there are no bugs or any other signs of distress.

Although this is a quick overview of Easter lily care, there is so much more about easter lillies.

Caring for Your Lilies

Your lily’s care depends on if you are going to plant your lily in a pot inside or plant it outside.lilies

If your plant is in a pot, be sure to place it somewhere that it’ll get indirect sunlight on a daily basis. Since these flowers are typically sold with decorative tin wrapped around them, be aware that water may gather at the bottom and impact your lily’s life.

Lilies that are planted outside in your garden are typically easier to care for than your indoor potted lily. For optimal growing, plant the lily 4-6 inches below the service.

Lighting

Easter lilies prefer full sun to partial shade. This means that in the harsh afternoon light, move your plant out of direct sunlight to prevent burning.

Optimally, your lily does best with the top half in the sun and the bottom half placed in the shade to keep the roots cool and moist. If needed, you can add mulch to shade the roots.

Water

To prevent waterlogging, remove any extra tin or plastic wrap from the lilies. Lilies thrive when they have even moisturized soil. Do not let the top part of the soil dry out, but also ensure that there is not excess soil on the bottom of the pot.

Although there is not a specific time to water your lily, watering it in the morning will give it time to dry in the afternoon sun to prevent any mold or mildew.

Soil and Fertilizer

Lilies like soil rich in organic matter. They specifically like to grow in more acidic soils, although they can still grow in any soil as long as it has proper drainage.

If your Easter lilies are potted and growing well, they do not need fertilizer. If you have lilies in your outdoor garden, you should use a slow-release fertilizer in early spring as they begin sprouting.

Temperature

Lilies grow best in cool and moderate climates. The temperature they grow the best in ranges from 50-70 degrees Fahrenheit.

Lilies tend to do best in moderate humidity levels as well. Weather that is too hot and dry or too hot and humid does not bode well for the Easter lily.

Pests and Diseases

Like many plants, Easter lilies are susceptible to a multitude of insects and diseases.

Red lily beetles, snails, and slugs are common pests to look out for. Many of these insects can spread diseases to the lily. Gray mold and root rot are also common diseases that affect the Easter lily.

Proper care will help lessen the probability that your lily will be infected by one of these diseases. Be sure to check your lilies daily to immediately take care of them and prevent further issues.

Are Lilies Toxic?

Although not toxic to humans or most pets, it is important to note that the Easter lily is toxic to felines. Try to keep the lilies out of reach or behind something that your cat cannot reach.

If you believe your cat ingested Easter lily, lookout for signs of loss of appetite, vomiting, or fatigue in your cat. The smallest ingestion of lily can be fatal to your cat. Get immediate care for your cat from a veterinarian if you believe they may be at risk.

Beautify Your Home

With these tips about how to care for your Easter lilies, there should be nothing stopping you from going to get Easter lilies! The beautiful lilies will spruce up your home this Easter season.

 

 

%%focuskw%% | How to Care for Easter Lilies

IMO anything about mindset are great

If you’re anything like me, keeping commitments to yourself isn’t easy. Staying committed to others who are relying on us is simple enough, but why is it so hard to keep those commitments to ourselves?

When I say keeping a commitment to yourself, I mean doing what you say you’re going to do. If you say you’re going to start waking up earlier, sticking up for yourself, working fewer hours, or eating better, those are commitments to yourself that no one else is going to do for you.

Keeping commitments to yourself

But if you’re always setting goals and plans for yourself but can’t seem to follow through with them, you’re breaking the most important promise – the one with yourself. I found myself getting tired of doing this, so I decided it was time to keep the commitments I make for myself. 

In this post, I’m sharing some thoughts I’ve had about self-commitment and how I’m shifting my mindset to prioritize my goals, especially when my doubts try to talk me out of things.

Why do we break promises to ourselves?


Keeping commitments to yourself

Why is keeping commitments to yourself so difficult? How come it’s easier to keep commitments to other people? Why do we let ourselves down so often and prioritize everything else instead?

Maybe because we’re taught that it’s selfish to prioritize ourselves. The funny thing is, I KNOW deep down that it’s not selfish to focus on my own needs. I don’t consider people who go after their goals selfish (as long as it’s not at the expense of others of course), yet it’s something I still have trouble with. 

Perhaps it’s a problem of limiting beliefs; it’s easy to think that we’re not worthy of achieving or getting what we want. We talk ourselves out of things by thinking there are more important things to focus on. Even if we have the time, we find ways to avoid it.

We plan as if we’re going to get what we want — we make lists of things we want to change, things we want to achieve, and the type of person we want to be. But when it comes to making the changes, the little step-by-step things to get us there, we chicken out.

Yes, it’s okay to focus on you


Keeping commitments to yourself

The truth is that our goals are often lofty and perhaps outside of our comfort zone (which is a good thing!). The problem is when we set expectations that are too high for ourselves, or we become too afraid of failure that we avoid taking action. 

Instead of believing in our needs and wants, we focus on our doubts instead. There might be a little voice in your head that says you’ll ostracize yourself from others if you focus on pursuing what you want. If the people around you don’t share the same goals as you, you might worry that they’ll judge you (whether you succeed or fail).

In reality, learning to value your own goals and desires is the only way you’ll be able to get to where you want to be. Not only does keeping commitments to yourself get you further ahead, but you’ll also feel good about yourself because you kept a promise to yourself.

If a change needs to happen, you have to get a little uncomfortable by prioritizing yourself. It’s okay to be selfish sometimes. No one else is going to stick up for your time and get the things done that you want to do, so it’s important that you keep your promises to yourself.

Keeping commitments to yourself is the ultimate act of self-love. Staying true to your word shows that you value your own goals and desires. You are capable of upholding the promises you make to yourself.

How I’m keeping commitments to myself


Keeping commitments to yourself

So what’s changed within me to help me keep my commitments to myself? Here’s what’s been helping me feel okay with prioritizing the internal promises I make:

Get in the right mindset

I recently came across a TikTok video where a girl talked about going for ‘hot girl walks‘. She mentioned that while you’re going for a walk, the only things you’re allowed to think about are what you’re grateful for and the goals you want to achieve. That hot girl walk concept is a little silly to me, but I do like the intention behind it.

Since I saw that, I’ve been noticing more when my mindset turns negative. I try to notice when I’m being hard on myself or doubting my own abilities. The more I become aware of these moments, the better I can act accordingly to pull myself out of this mindset.

Each time I’m faced with something I don’t feel like doing (especially when it’s a commitment I made to myself), I pause for a moment and ask what I need to get me into a better state of mind. Often that’s putting on a playlist with uplifting songs and dancing around to make myself feel better. Don’t underestimate the power of a good playlist to get you in the right mindset.

Related Post: 5 Daily Habits For A Healthy Mindset


Repetition is key

Something I’ve found that helps with self-discipline and commitment is doing something at the same time every day (or in the same order every day). For example, I struggled for a long time to be consistent with daily exercise. 

I would tell myself to keep things interesting by switching up the time I did my workouts each day. Unfortunately this didn’t help with consistency at all. Often thinking about when I was going to do a workout took up more brain space than it really needed to.

What’s helped me to be super consistent over the past few months is working out first thing in the morning. My routine is to get up, go to the bathroom, drink some water, get changed into workout clothes, then do a workout. It’s the same order every morning which means that I don’t even have to think about what I’m doing to do. I’m still a little groggy at that time, so I don’t really give my brain a chance to try and get out of it.

Since I’ve made the commitment to exercise every morning and get up earlier, I don’t really lack motivation around it anymore. If I’m ever laying in bed and not wanting to get up, I think to myself, ‘I don’t want to fall back into my old habits’ and I force myself to get up out of bed.

Related Post: How To Have Self-Discipline When You’re Feeling Lazy


Follow your North node

I haven’t really talked about astrology on the blog before, but it’s something that I’m often exploring to learn more about myself. Of course, I’m hesitant about taking it too seriously, but discovering my North node is something that’s given me an extra dose of motivation to stay committed to myself.

The North node is essentially the traits you need to develop in order to fulfill your life’s purpose and find happiness. I discovered that my North Node is in Capricorn, which means that I need to stay disciplined, honor my desire for success, and go after my goals. My opposing South Node is in Cancer which means I’m prone to retreating from the world and dwelling on the past.

When I start falling back into old habits and thought patterns, I think about whether that’s helping me to fulfill my purpose. Often it’s not, so I encourage myself to focus on what will help me achieve my goals instead.

If you’re curious about finding your North node, you can do that here.


Question: What commitments do you want to keep to yourself?

Overall, I’ve learned that keeping commitments to yourself means getting your mindset right, repeating what works, and learning more about yourself so you can focus on what you need.

I encourage you to think of a goal or habit you’ve been wanting to master for a long time. Ask yourself why you haven’t been following through with it, and then make a commitment to go after what you want. After all, no one else is going to do it for you.

The post How To Keep Commitments To Yourself appeared first on The Blissful Mind.

Worlds best method fan right here

If you’re anything like me, keeping commitments to yourself isn’t easy. Staying committed to others who are relying on us is simple enough, but why is it so hard to keep those commitments to ourselves?

When I say keeping a commitment to yourself, I mean doing what you say you’re going to do. If you say you’re going to start waking up earlier, sticking up for yourself, working fewer hours, or eating better, those are commitments to yourself that no one else is going to do for you.

Keeping commitments to yourself

But if you’re always setting goals and plans for yourself but can’t seem to follow through with them, you’re breaking the most important promise – the one with yourself. I found myself getting tired of doing this, so I decided it was time to keep the commitments I make for myself. 

In this post, I’m sharing some thoughts I’ve had about self-commitment and how I’m shifting my mindset to prioritize my goals, especially when my doubts try to talk me out of things.

Why do we break promises to ourselves?


Keeping commitments to yourself

Why is keeping commitments to yourself so difficult? How come it’s easier to keep commitments to other people? Why do we let ourselves down so often and prioritize everything else instead?

Maybe because we’re taught that it’s selfish to prioritize ourselves. The funny thing is, I KNOW deep down that it’s not selfish to focus on my own needs. I don’t consider people who go after their goals selfish (as long as it’s not at the expense of others of course), yet it’s something I still have trouble with. 

Perhaps it’s a problem of limiting beliefs; it’s easy to think that we’re not worthy of achieving or getting what we want. We talk ourselves out of things by thinking there are more important things to focus on. Even if we have the time, we find ways to avoid it.

We plan as if we’re going to get what we want — we make lists of things we want to change, things we want to achieve, and the type of person we want to be. But when it comes to making the changes, the little step-by-step things to get us there, we chicken out.

Yes, it’s okay to focus on you


Keeping commitments to yourself

The truth is that our goals are often lofty and perhaps outside of our comfort zone (which is a good thing!). The problem is when we set expectations that are too high for ourselves, or we become too afraid of failure that we avoid taking action. 

Instead of believing in our needs and wants, we focus on our doubts instead. There might be a little voice in your head that says you’ll ostracize yourself from others if you focus on pursuing what you want. If the people around you don’t share the same goals as you, you might worry that they’ll judge you (whether you succeed or fail).

In reality, learning to value your own goals and desires is the only way you’ll be able to get to where you want to be. Not only does keeping commitments to yourself get you further ahead, but you’ll also feel good about yourself because you kept a promise to yourself.

If a change needs to happen, you have to get a little uncomfortable by prioritizing yourself. It’s okay to be selfish sometimes. No one else is going to stick up for your time and get the things done that you want to do, so it’s important that you keep your promises to yourself.

Keeping commitments to yourself is the ultimate act of self-love. Staying true to your word shows that you value your own goals and desires. You are capable of upholding the promises you make to yourself.

How I’m keeping commitments to myself


Keeping commitments to yourself

So what’s changed within me to help me keep my commitments to myself? Here’s what’s been helping me feel okay with prioritizing the internal promises I make:

Get in the right mindset

I recently came across a TikTok video where a girl talked about going for ‘hot girl walks‘. She mentioned that while you’re going for a walk, the only things you’re allowed to think about are what you’re grateful for and the goals you want to achieve. That hot girl walk concept is a little silly to me, but I do like the intention behind it.

Since I saw that, I’ve been noticing more when my mindset turns negative. I try to notice when I’m being hard on myself or doubting my own abilities. The more I become aware of these moments, the better I can act accordingly to pull myself out of this mindset.

Each time I’m faced with something I don’t feel like doing (especially when it’s a commitment I made to myself), I pause for a moment and ask what I need to get me into a better state of mind. Often that’s putting on a playlist with uplifting songs and dancing around to make myself feel better. Don’t underestimate the power of a good playlist to get you in the right mindset.

Related Post: 5 Daily Habits For A Healthy Mindset


Repetition is key

Something I’ve found that helps with self-discipline and commitment is doing something at the same time every day (or in the same order every day). For example, I struggled for a long time to be consistent with daily exercise. 

I would tell myself to keep things interesting by switching up the time I did my workouts each day. Unfortunately this didn’t help with consistency at all. Often thinking about when I was going to do a workout took up more brain space than it really needed to.

What’s helped me to be super consistent over the past few months is working out first thing in the morning. My routine is to get up, go to the bathroom, drink some water, get changed into workout clothes, then do a workout. It’s the same order every morning which means that I don’t even have to think about what I’m doing to do. I’m still a little groggy at that time, so I don’t really give my brain a chance to try and get out of it.

Since I’ve made the commitment to exercise every morning and get up earlier, I don’t really lack motivation around it anymore. If I’m ever laying in bed and not wanting to get up, I think to myself, ‘I don’t want to fall back into my old habits’ and I force myself to get up out of bed.

Related Post: How To Have Self-Discipline When You’re Feeling Lazy


Follow your North node

I haven’t really talked about astrology on the blog before, but it’s something that I’m often exploring to learn more about myself. Of course, I’m hesitant about taking it too seriously, but discovering my North node is something that’s given me an extra dose of motivation to stay committed to myself.

The North node is essentially the traits you need to develop in order to fulfill your life’s purpose and find happiness. I discovered that my North Node is in Capricorn, which means that I need to stay disciplined, honor my desire for success, and go after my goals. My opposing South Node is in Cancer which means I’m prone to retreating from the world and dwelling on the past.

When I start falling back into old habits and thought patterns, I think about whether that’s helping me to fulfill my purpose. Often it’s not, so I encourage myself to focus on what will help me achieve my goals instead.

If you’re curious about finding your North node, you can do that here.


Question: What commitments do you want to keep to yourself?

Overall, I’ve learned that keeping commitments to yourself means getting your mindset right, repeating what works, and learning more about yourself so you can focus on what you need.

I encourage you to think of a goal or habit you’ve been wanting to master for a long time. Ask yourself why you haven’t been following through with it, and then make a commitment to go after what you want. After all, no one else is going to do it for you.

The post How To Keep Commitments To Yourself appeared first on The Blissful Mind.

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Stop Asking Couples When They Are Having Kids

“So, when are you having kids?” my aunt asked me. At that point, I was 30 and had just been married for a few months. I didn’t even know if I wanted kids, much less when I was having them.

So I simply said, “I have not decided if I want to have kids.” I would spend the next hour listening to stories of women who regretted not having children because they had put it off until it was too late, and women who had difficulty conceiving because they had waited too long or because of their own biological issues, almost told as an implicit way to tell me that I was going to regret it if I didn’t hurry and work on producing kids right away.

This would be my life for the next few years, where I would receive constant, invasive questions surrounding “When are you having kids?” from relatives, friends, and nosy people, followed by a routine, almost ritualistic pressurization to have kids.

If you think that it ends after you have a kid, it doesn’t. The people who had previously told you to have “just one kid” when you were indifferent to the idea, will now tell you to have a second one, along with reasons why you should do so. This repeated questioning and attempt to shape people to fit their expectations seem to never end.

The problem with asking “When are you having kids?”

I understand why people like to ask this question. Find a partner, settle down, get married, and have kids. This is the life path that we’ve been taught to follow since young. This is the life path we’ve been told is the way of life.

This is especially so in the Chinese culture, where having kids is seen as the ultimate goal in life. There are even sayings built around this notion, such as 生儿育女 (shēng ér yù nǚ, which means to birth sons and raise daughters) and 子孙满堂 (zǐ sūn mǎn táng, which means to be in a room filled with children and grandchildren, used to signify the epitome of happiness).

Multi-Generation Chinese Family at the Park

A multi-generation family, often used to depict a vision of happiness in the Chinese culture

So after you get married, people automatically assume that you should have kids. “When are you having kids?” they ask, as if expecting you to give them a straight answer.

The problem with this question is that it’s rude. It’s invasive. It’s also presumptuous.

1) Having kids is not the only path to happiness

To begin with, having kids is a personal and private matter. Whether people want to have kids or not is none of anyone’s business, and people most certainly shouldn’t be opening conversations with “When are you having kids?”, as if the only goal of a person’s life is to have kids. Even if it’s for the intent of having a heart-to-heart, a question like “Do you have any plans for kids?” would be more appropriate.

But in case one needs specific reasons to understand why such a question is invasive, the first thing to understand is that everyone has their own path in life. This path is not always the same for everyone. Some people want kids, while some don’t. Some think that having kids is the greatest joy in life, while some see them as a burden.

Having kids is a lifelong commitment and takes a tremendous amount of work and time. Anyone who has kids, and has raised them by themselves, would understand this. There are significant ups and downs that come with having a kid. For some, the ups do not justify the downs. For these people, it is better to remain childless, rather than have children just to fit society’s mold. To assume that everyone should have kids, just because others think that having kids is great and amazing, is rude and disregards that person’s own preferences in life.

For example, Oprah Winfrey is an inspiring woman and humanitarian who chose not to have kids, and has dedicated herself to her personal purpose of serving the world. Oprah hosted her talk show The Oprah Winfrey Show for 25 years, founded a leadership academy for girls and became a mother figure to the girls in attendance, and started her own television network. These are things that most do not get to do in their lifetime. Through the years, she has inspired millions and become a champion for people worldwide. As she says,

“When people were pressuring me to get married and have children, I knew I was not going to be a person that ever regretted not having them, because I feel like I am a mother to the world’s children. Love knows no boundaries. It doesn’t matter if a child came from your womb or if you found that person at age two, 10, or 20. If the love is real, the caring is pure and it comes from a good space, it works.” — Oprah[1]

Is she not being a responsible or purposeful person (or woman) by choosing not to have kids? Definitely not. In fact, I dare say that she lives a much more purposeful life than many in the world, including people who choose to have kids.

There are many famous celebrities who have chosen not to have kids as well.

  • Chelsea Handler is a talk show host who chose not to have kids. She has said honestly in interviews that she doesn’t have the time to raise a child, and she doesn’t want her kids to be raised by a nanny.[2][3]
  • Betty White is an actress and comedian who chose not to have kids because she’s passionate about her career and she prefers to focus on it.[4]
  • Ashley Judd is an actress and political activist who chose not to have kids because she feels that there are already so many orphaned kids in this world. To her, her resources can be better used to help those who are already here, and I respect her for such a noble choice.[5]

And then there are others, such as Cameron Diaz, Chow Yun Fat, Marisa Tomei, Renée Zellweger, and Rachael Ray. These people choose not to have kids for different reasons, such as because they’re already pursuing paths deeply meaningful to them, because they do not wish to be tied down with a child, or because they just don’t feel a deep desire to have kids.

Not having kids has not prevented these people from being happy in life, and there’s no reason to assume why people must have kids in order to be happy. People need to stop painting the narrative that one must have children in order to be happy. There are plenty of people with kids who are unhappy, and plenty of people without kids who have found inner fulfillment in life through other ways. There is no one path to happiness, and everyone needs to realize that.

2) You may cause hurt and pain

Secondly, you never know what others are going through.

Some people may want kids, but maybe they are facing fertility struggles. For example,

  • Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan went through three miscarriages before having their firstborn.[6]
  • The Obamas had a miscarriage before they had their daughters via IVF.[7]
  • Friends star Courteney Cox had a total of seven miscarriages before having her daughter, as she has a MTHFR gene mutation which raises the risk of miscarriage-causing blood clots.[8]

About 10% of women have difficulty getting pregnant or staying pregnant,[9] while 13.5% of known pregnancies end in miscarriages, with the figure rising as the maternal age rises.[10]

For some people, the journey to conceive is fraught with deep pain, struggle, and losses as they experience miscarriages, undergo round after round of invasive fertility treatments, and wait in hope of the double blue lines on their pregnancy kit each month.

And then there are people who cannot have their own biological children due to issues with their reproductive system, which could have been there since birth.

Barack Obama, Michelle Obama, and family

Barack and Michelle Obama had a miscarriage before they had their daughters via IVF

While you may be think that you’re being helpful or funny by asking people when they’re having kids, your question may well trigger hurt and pain. As Zuckerberg said,

“You feel so hopeful when you learn you’re going to have a child. You start imagining who they’ll become and dreaming of hopes for their future. You start making plans, and then they’re gone. It’s a lonely experience.”[6]

3) Not everyone is in a place to have kids

Thirdly, having kids is simply not a reality for some people due to their circumstances in life.

Some people may lack the financial resources to have kids, a reality in a place like Singapore.

Some people may be facing problems with their marriage, in which case their priority should be to work on their marriage, not to have kids.

Some people may be so burdened with caring for their dependents that they are unable to consider kids, at least not at the moment.

And then there are people facing chronic health issues, issues that you don’t know and can’t see, which make pregnancy difficult due to the toll it would take on their body.

4) Some people could still be thinking

And then there are people who are neutral to the idea of having kids, like myself when I just got married. These people need time to think it through, because having kids is a permanent, lifelong decision with serious consequences. There’s no reason to assume that having a kid should be an automatic decision, because you’re bringing a whole new life into this world. This is a decision that will change your life forever, as well as the life of the child you’re bringing into the world. I personally think one of the worst things someone could do is to simply have kids for the sake of it, and then afterward give their child sub-standard care, something which I feel many people do.

For those yet to have kids, they need the space to figure out what they want, not have people breathe down their neck day in and out about having kids.

My experience

For the initial years after I got married, I wasn’t thinking about kids. Firstly, having a child is a lifelong decision, and I wanted to enjoy married life before diving into a decision as serious as that. Secondly, my husband and I were happy spending our lives with just each other — we didn’t feel the need to have kids, not in the way my culture obsesses about it. Thirdly, my husband was dealing with some personal problems and I was fully focused on supporting him through these. These were issues that we needed to sort through before considering kids, if we were to want kids.

Yet I kept getting nudges to have kids, even though I never said anything about wanting them.

“So, when are you having kids?”

“This person’s baby is so cute, isn’t it? Why don’t you hurry up and birth a baby?”

It was as if I was some vehicle, some production machine to have kids, where my own views in the matter didn’t matter. The most frustrating thing was that I kept getting this question, while my husband would never get it (as a man), not even when we were in the same room together.

It was as if my sole reason for existence as a woman was to have kids, and until I had them, I was regarded as unworthy or incomplete.

The decision to have kids

Yet the decision to have children is a personal one. It is also a complex one. It is a decision that will permanently change the lives of the couple.

It is not a decision that one should be pressurized into making because their mom wants to carry grandchildren or their aunt wants to play with kids. It’s a decision that a couple should make because they genuinely want to nurture another life.

Because when a child is born, the people bugging others to have kids aren’t the ones who will be caring for the baby 24/7, whose lives will be set back by years (even decades) as they care for a new life, or who will be responsible for every decision concerning the child for the next 18-21 years.

It will be the couple.

And the people who aren’t ready, who were pressured into having kids because they were told that it was the best thing to do, may have to deal with regret as they are stuck with a decision they cannot undo. Because there are people who regret having kids, and we need to be honest about that. These people regret, not because of the child’s fault, but because they were simply not ready to have kids, be it financially, emotionally, or mentally. Unfortunately, the children are the ones who eventually suffer, from living in dysfunctional households to dealing with issues of violenceabuse, and anger.

We need to recognize these realities, and not make parenthood seem like it’s some magical band-aid that solves a lack of purpose or life’s pressures. Things don’t magically get better because people have kids; existing problems usually worsen as having a child puts a big strain on a couple’s lives. Digging into people’s plans to have kids, and pressurizing them into one of the biggest life decisions they can ever make, will only stress them out and perhaps push some into depression. As this redditor shared,

“I have a friend who went through 6 years of miscarriages and fertility treatments before the doctors figured out the problem and she had her son. The nosy ladies at her work and her in-laws questioned her constantly. The depression from that made it harder for her to conceive.”

Stop asking couples when they’re having kids

So, if you like to ask others when they’re having kids, it’s time to stop that. It’s rude, insensitive, and it disregards people’s privacy. It’s also none of your business.

The reality is that if people want kids, they will work on having kids. They don’t need you to prod them.

If they don’t have kids, it’s either because

  1. they don’t want kids,
  2. they have not thought about having kids but they don’t need you to prod them,
  3. they are not in a position to consider kids right now, or
  4. they want kids but they are facing some struggles.

For people in group (d), they aren’t going to share such deeply personal experience over some afternoon coffee chat, and certainly not by you asking, “When are you having kids?”

The best thing you can do is to give people space. Understand that having kids is a personal decision, and people don’t have to share or explain anything. Respect that others have their right to privacy. Respect that people are individuals on their own path, and this path may not involve having kids. And this doesn’t make them incomplete or lesser in any way.

Instead of asking people “When are you having kids?”, talk to them like you would to a normal person. There’s no reason why conversations should suddenly revolve around childbearing after marriage; it’s not like a person’s identity changes to revolve around having kids. A person still has their own passion, goals, and dreams. Talk to them about what they’ve been doing. Understand their interests. Know them as a real person, not some random being here to fulfill society’s checklist.

If you’re really interested in someone’s plan to have children, like I mentioned in the beginning, you can simply ask, “Do you have any plans for kids?” If they wish to share more, they will do so. If they give a half-hearted or evasive answer, then take the hint and move on.

Ultimately, having kids or not doesn’t change one’s self-worth. A woman is complete with or without kids. A marriage doesn’t need kids to be deemed complete. Having kids should be a conscious choice, not a result of external pressure. Don’t judge people by whether they have kids or not. Some people will have kids, and some people will not have kids. Some will have kids early, while some will have them later in life. All of these are different paths and there’s nothing wrong with them.

My husband and I eventually decided to have a baby and we now have our beloved baby girl. Yet other people’s comments and nudges to have children didn’t make me want to have children; it only irritated me and made me want to avoid these people, because having a child is a personal decision and has nothing to do with them. It was after we enjoyed married life without kids, and had the space to actively pursue our goals and interests, that we finally felt ready to try for a kid.

In the meantime, I hope all of you are doing well. There are things that I’m working on that I look forward to sharing in time to come. Sending lots of love to you, and remember that whatever life challenge you’re facing, you have it in you to overcome it.

Who else? <3mindset ?

One year ago today the world went into lockdown.

Businesses were put on hold, schools closed, events cancelled, and life as we knew it changed forever.

To cope, many folks hit the pause button on their dreams and ambitions because it was tough enough to keep up with the ever-changing status quo.

While this might not be an anniversary to celebrate, it’s an important one to remember. Because one year later you still have dreams — and those dreams still matter. You don’t have to wait for the world to “go back to normal” to pursue them.

You can take control of your life again — starting now.

In today’s MarieTV, I answer a question from Toni, who describes the “quarantine slump” we’ve all been feeling SO well:

During this quarantine, I hoped to make major progress on my projects. It turns out that it was just another year of living in an intensely reactive mode… and having my creativity and will beat down a little bit. I would like to hit the ground and be ready to take things on, but I’m still feeling paralyzed.

It’s time to break free from that creative slump and dust off your dreams!


Ambiguity is the enemy of execution
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In this episode, you’ll learn:

  • How to create massive momentum in just 14 days.
  • My secret to showing up with passion everyday.
  • How to get crystal clear on your #1 priority.
  • 2 simple steps to feel energized and motivated again.

If you follow these two steps consistently for 14 days, you’ll feel on fire.

Keep reading below the video for a chance to win a free copy of my #1 NY Times Bestseller Everything is Figureoutable.

View Transcript

Check out this episode on The Marie Forleo Podcast

Listen Now

DIVE DEEPER: Keep stalling on your ideas? How to start before you’re ready — plus one question to motivate yourself to do anything.

Now it’s time to turn your insights into action — with a bonus book giveaway — because you can’t take control of your life with wishful thinking alone. You have to take action.

Your first action? Leaving a comment below for accountability and a chance to win.

Three lucky winners will be chosen to receive a free copy of Everything is Figureoutable.

In the comments below:

  1. Tell us what dream, goal, or project is your #1 priority right now and why.
  2. Make a public commitment to the 14-day #MoveItMoveItChallenge, follow and tag @MarieForleo on Instagram

Whether you join us for the 14-day #MoveItMoveItChallenge or not, remember this:

Creativity, passion, and clarity live in your body, not your mind.

XO

The post Stuck in a Creative Slump? 2 Steps to Take Control of Your Life After a Year in Quarantine appeared first on .

anyone love this post as much as i do

If you’re anything like me, keeping commitments to yourself isn’t easy. Staying committed to others who are relying on us is simple enough, but why is it so hard to keep those commitments to ourselves?

When I say keeping a commitment to yourself, I mean doing what you say you’re going to do. If you say you’re going to start waking up earlier, sticking up for yourself, working fewer hours, or eating better, those are commitments to yourself that no one else is going to do for you.

Keeping commitments to yourself

But if you’re always setting goals and plans for yourself but can’t seem to follow through with them, you’re breaking the most important promise – the one with yourself. I found myself getting tired of doing this, so I decided it was time to keep the commitments I make for myself. 

In this post, I’m sharing some thoughts I’ve had about self-commitment and how I’m shifting my mindset to prioritize my goals, especially when my doubts try to talk me out of things.

Why do we break promises to ourselves?


Keeping commitments to yourself

Why is keeping commitments to yourself so difficult? How come it’s easier to keep commitments to other people? Why do we let ourselves down so often and prioritize everything else instead?

Maybe because we’re taught that it’s selfish to prioritize ourselves. The funny thing is, I KNOW deep down that it’s not selfish to focus on my own needs. I don’t consider people who go after their goals selfish (as long as it’s not at the expense of others of course), yet it’s something I still have trouble with. 

Perhaps it’s a problem of limiting beliefs; it’s easy to think that we’re not worthy of achieving or getting what we want. We talk ourselves out of things by thinking there are more important things to focus on. Even if we have the time, we find ways to avoid it.

We plan as if we’re going to get what we want — we make lists of things we want to change, things we want to achieve, and the type of person we want to be. But when it comes to making the changes, the little step-by-step things to get us there, we chicken out.

Yes, it’s okay to focus on you


Keeping commitments to yourself

The truth is that our goals are often lofty and perhaps outside of our comfort zone (which is a good thing!). The problem is when we set expectations that are too high for ourselves, or we become too afraid of failure that we avoid taking action. 

Instead of believing in our needs and wants, we focus on our doubts instead. There might be a little voice in your head that says you’ll ostracize yourself from others if you focus on pursuing what you want. If the people around you don’t share the same goals as you, you might worry that they’ll judge you (whether you succeed or fail).

In reality, learning to value your own goals and desires is the only way you’ll be able to get to where you want to be. Not only does keeping commitments to yourself get you further ahead, but you’ll also feel good about yourself because you kept a promise to yourself.

If a change needs to happen, you have to get a little uncomfortable by prioritizing yourself. It’s okay to be selfish sometimes. No one else is going to stick up for your time and get the things done that you want to do, so it’s important that you keep your promises to yourself.

Keeping commitments to yourself is the ultimate act of self-love. Staying true to your word shows that you value your own goals and desires. You are capable of upholding the promises you make to yourself.

How I’m keeping commitments to myself


Keeping commitments to yourself

So what’s changed within me to help me keep my commitments to myself? Here’s what’s been helping me feel okay with prioritizing the internal promises I make:

Get in the right mindset

I recently came across a TikTok video where a girl talked about going for ‘hot girl walks‘. She mentioned that while you’re going for a walk, the only things you’re allowed to think about are what you’re grateful for and the goals you want to achieve. That hot girl walk concept is a little silly to me, but I do like the intention behind it.

Since I saw that, I’ve been noticing more when my mindset turns negative. I try to notice when I’m being hard on myself or doubting my own abilities. The more I become aware of these moments, the better I can act accordingly to pull myself out of this mindset.

Each time I’m faced with something I don’t feel like doing (especially when it’s a commitment I made to myself), I pause for a moment and ask what I need to get me into a better state of mind. Often that’s putting on a playlist with uplifting songs and dancing around to make myself feel better. Don’t underestimate the power of a good playlist to get you in the right mindset.

Related Post: 5 Daily Habits For A Healthy Mindset


Repetition is key

Something I’ve found that helps with self-discipline and commitment is doing something at the same time every day (or in the same order every day). For example, I struggled for a long time to be consistent with daily exercise. 

I would tell myself to keep things interesting by switching up the time I did my workouts each day. Unfortunately this didn’t help with consistency at all. Often thinking about when I was going to do a workout took up more brain space than it really needed to.

What’s helped me to be super consistent over the past few months is working out first thing in the morning. My routine is to get up, go to the bathroom, drink some water, get changed into workout clothes, then do a workout. It’s the same order every morning which means that I don’t even have to think about what I’m doing to do. I’m still a little groggy at that time, so I don’t really give my brain a chance to try and get out of it.

Since I’ve made the commitment to exercise every morning and get up earlier, I don’t really lack motivation around it anymore. If I’m ever laying in bed and not wanting to get up, I think to myself, ‘I don’t want to fall back into my old habits’ and I force myself to get up out of bed.

Related Post: How To Have Self-Discipline When You’re Feeling Lazy


Follow your North node

I haven’t really talked about astrology on the blog before, but it’s something that I’m often exploring to learn more about myself. Of course, I’m hesitant about taking it too seriously, but discovering my North node is something that’s given me an extra dose of motivation to stay committed to myself.

The North node is essentially the traits you need to develop in order to fulfill your life’s purpose and find happiness. I discovered that my North Node is in Capricorn, which means that I need to stay disciplined, honor my desire for success, and go after my goals. My opposing South Node is in Cancer which means I’m prone to retreating from the world and dwelling on the past.

When I start falling back into old habits and thought patterns, I think about whether that’s helping me to fulfill my purpose. Often it’s not, so I encourage myself to focus on what will help me achieve my goals instead.

If you’re curious about finding your North node, you can do that here.


Question: What commitments do you want to keep to yourself?

Overall, I’ve learned that keeping commitments to yourself means getting your mindset right, repeating what works, and learning more about yourself so you can focus on what you need.

I encourage you to think of a goal or habit you’ve been wanting to master for a long time. Ask yourself why you haven’t been following through with it, and then make a commitment to go after what you want. After all, no one else is going to do it for you.

The post How To Keep Commitments To Yourself appeared first on The Blissful Mind.

Thanks

Two weeks ago, I wrote about how money mistakes are temporary. My main argument was that unlike other kinds of mistakes, money mistakes rarely have permanent consequences.

I’ll return to that in this post, but first let’s consider a few things that have happened this month:

  • We’ve all been hearing about NFTs, also known as “non-fungible tokens,” also known as digital art that can be reproduced over and over but sells for a ton of money. The NBA has sold $230 million on these intangible “items.” An artist sold one for $69 million the other day, and I’m sure that record will be broken soon.
  • The price of a single Bitcoin, another modern invention, has risen to more than $60,000. Like NFTs, Bitcoin is also completely digital. There is no such thing as “a Bitcoin” you can carry in your pocket or store in your safe deposit box at the bank. Everyone who trades Bitcoin or other digital currencies simply accepts that it exists.
  • The U.S. government has passed a law enacting a $1.9 trillion stimulus package. Put another way, the U.S. government has printed $1.9 trillion more dollars. This was on top of another $2 trillion they printed last March. And presumably there’s more where that came from!

I stand by my original argument, but let’s add another one to the mix: The reason why money mistakes are temporary is because money itself is fictitious. Money is imaginary. It’s as abstract as a highlight reel of Lebron James that sells for $200,000.

To be more precise, we could say that money is the product of a collective imagination. If two parties agree that something is “worth” a certain amount, then it is. If they don’t, then it isn’t.

So here then is the question: If the government can print money and no one seems to mind, why can’t you?

Your answer might be, “Because I want to respect the rules of western capitalism,” and that’s a perfectly reasonable answer. Sometimes it’s good to follow traffic laws, at least if they’re necessary.

Just understand that these rules—especially the financial ones—are products of our imagination.

Like Bitcoin or NFTs, they exist because people decide they do. Without collective belief, no form of money has any real value. To return to my statement from my original post: “The thing about money mistakes is that you can always make more money.”

This is what you should be thinking about. Once you accept that money isn’t real, you worry less about a lot of things—and not only money.

But What About the Homeless? (etc.)

In response to the last post, a few people brought up a few concerns. It’s easy to say “Don’t worry about money” if you have plenty of money, they told me, but what about everyone who is poor?

This is a very good point! (I made the same point in the original post more than once, but most people don’t read before complaining.)

So let’s get into this more here, and consider the issue of homelessness. This issue is not at all insignificant—but money can’t fix it, at least not for society at large.

This is because unlike money, homelessness is not something that is essentially imagined.

You either have a safe, comfortable place to live or you don’t. If someone says, “Being homeless isn’t real, so don’t worry about it”—you should rightly suggest that they see how they feel after being homeless for a while.

But when it comes to addressing the issue of homelessness, that’s where a tangible problem meets an intangible resource. If money could solve homelessness, Bill Gates could just write a very large check. Not only could he, he probably would! The man is incredibly generous.

But he’s also incredibly smart, and knows that his large check wouldn’t work, at least not at scale, so he spends his money on trying to eliminate malaria and improve sanitation for Africa.

We could say the same thing about any other number of societal problems, including educational and healthcare disparities in the United States, the richest country in the world. Not everyone has access to the same systems, so that’s what we need to work on.

In short: don’t miss the forest for the trees. If you do, you’ll miss the chance to think about how you can use the fiction of money as a tool—just like the government does.

“But the government can’t just keep printing money, right?” (Answer: sure it can!)

This is another concern that people tend to bring up when you point out that money isn’t real. You may have been told in economics class that the government can’t simply print all the money it wants without consequences such as inflation kicking in.

Well, this is true in places like Zimbabwe, where I once paid one million dollars in local currency for a Diet Coke. (Exchange rate: 300,000 Zimbabwe dollars was $1 USD.) The price was actually $800,000, and I added $200,000 as a tip—partly because, I admit, I thought it would be cool to spend a million “dollars” on a soda. But in Zimbabwe they stopped trusting their own currency, so the U.S. dollar became the de facto instrument of exchange.

Will the world stop trusting U.S. dollars too? Probably at some point! But a) it won’t be anytime soon, and b) when they do, where are they going to turn?

The answer to that is decentralized digital currency, which brings us back to where we started. Bitcoin and NFTs have value because people decide that they do, just like gold or paintings by 19th century impressionists or anything else.

Whenever someone says “The government shouldn’t print extra money,” what they mean is “The government should only print extra money for something I agree with.”

So here’s my proposal: what if, instead of arguing over which interest group should get paid, they all did? Stimulus checks today, tomorrow, and the day after.

It’s probably not going to happen exactly like that, but again, don’t miss the forest for the trees. The forest is that money is only as real as people say that it is. What can you do with this knowledge?

Time to Get to Work!

What you need to do in these situations is apply them to your own life. How can you hack systems for your benefit?

  • If you have tens of thousands of student loan debt, what would happen if you just decided to ignore it? (I’m not kidding. Think it through: what would happen?)
  • If you think you’ll have more money in the future (however “money” is defined), why should you sacrifice today? Dave Ramsey tells you to live frugally, but his house is currently listed for sale for $15 million. Financing at low rates is widely available, just as it was before the bad lending crisis of 2008.
  • Don’t stop on the consumer side: lots of businesses do just fine paying their executives large bonuses while never actually making a profit. Better yet, start an airline and get billions of dollars in taxpayer money that you’ve already said you don’t need.

Most of all: what if you just made the system work for you instead of the other way around?

To use a hockey metaphor, don’t skate where the puck is now, skate where the puck is going. (Disclaimer: I know nothing about hockey, but this seems like a logical enough idea.)

If you don’t like these examples, that’s okay. Plenty of other people will default on their student loans or get billions of dollars for operating unprofitable airlines.

That said, I challenge you to think about how you could apply this perspective to your life. If you’ve always believed that money is real, do you feel differently now that you know it’s not?

If nothing else, don’t let people or institutions use the threat of an imaginary resource against you any more. Educate yourself!

If your boss threatens to fire you, call their bluff. If a debt collector harasses you, fight back. Or better yet: them they can collect it in the form of digital art.

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Images: Christine, MPA, Bermix, Giorgio