I think stuff about mindset are fantastic who agrees?

By Leo Babauta

I don’t care about being efficient and productive just to be a better person, to get more done, to be more awesome. Cranking out more stuff for productivity’s sake doesn’t interest me anymore (it used to).

Today, I care about productivity only as it affects my mission.

I’m on a mission to change the world, and if I can be more focused, effective, and powerful as I do that … then it serves the mission.

What doesn’t serve the mission is burning myself out. I’m in this for the long haul, and rest and self-care are incredibly important.

I also don’t want to just have my nose to the grindstone. I care about the experience I’m having as I’m on my mission — it needs to be powerful, joyful, meaningful. I’m not just cranking widgets.

With that context in mind … let’s look at what is essential to this kind of productivity — what I think of as Essential Meaningful Productivity.

What’s Essential Meaningful Productivity

There’s three parts to this:

  1. Essential: You focus on what’s essential, not just busywork, not what feels urgent, not on what other people are asking you for (though what’s essential might be some of all three of those). This should be essential for your mission or something incredibly important to you (health, loved ones, etc.). Work on what matters. This means getting clear every day on what’s essential to you.
  2. Meaningful: This should not just feel like the next thing on your task list … it should feel like the most meaningful thing on your task list. You might even open yourself up to feeling like this is your purpose, your joy. This is serving someone out of love, with devotion. It’s like when I made dinner for my wife & kids last night — this was an act of nourishing them, of taking care of them, of loving them. Writing this post feels like that for me. In fact, we can bring that kind of meaning to most tasks, if we practice this kind of devotion.
  3. Productive: In this mode of work, I’m focused. I don’t turn away from the difficulty or discomfort or uncertainty, running to distractions or easier tasks. It’s important, it’s meaningful, it’s an act of love — and the people I’m serving are so worth this discomfort. I clear away distractions, and go into full-screen mode, giving this my entire focus.

As you can see, these three parts overlap quite a bit. Each word is really describing a different aspect of the same thing, but each is useful.

So how do you do this? Let’s look at the keys to making this happen.

The Keys to Essential Meaningful Productivity

You can actually do this in an infinite number of ways, but here are some elements I’ve found to be important in my own exploration:

  1. Work on what matters. Do you know your most important tasks for today? For the week? For the month? For your mission or life? This is something to get clear on. We don’t always have to be perfect, but the idea is to know what’s essential, and to focus on that more of the time.
  2. Structure sessions. Most of us just go through the day doing random things at random times, with no structure. Some people structure their days so rigidly that there’s no room for spontaneity or rest. The middle way, I’ve found, is to create structured sessions: 30 minutes for working on an essential task, for example. Or 90 minutes for writing. 15 minutes to process your inbox or messages. Two ideas: do your top most important task for 60-90 minutes at the start of every day. First thing. Second, do focused pomodoro sessions (25 minutes of focus on one task) 6 times throughout the day, every day.
  3. Pour yourself into it. Put meaning & joy into each session. OK, you’re starting a session. Make this a meaningful session — first, by reminding yourself why this is meaningful to you. Second, by pouring yourself into it fully, as if this were the most important thing in the universe. The only thing in the universe. Third, let yourself play, find joy, or otherwise /feel alive/ during this session!
  4. Turn towards instead of away. You will feel uncertainty, fear or discomfort around some of your most important tasks. That’s called “groundlessness” — the uncertainty of not having solid ground under your feet. Instead of turning away, turn towards this task. Stay with the groundlessness, mindfully. Be present with the fear and uncertainty, but don’t let it force you to exit. Let it be an act of love and devotion to stay in the middle of the groundlessness as you do the task.
  5. Put smaller things into focused sessions. It might be true that few individual emails or messages or errands are going to be essential — so under the guidelines above, you might think you should never answer those emails or messages, never do the errands. But doing errands, paying bills, answering emails — these are all important at some level. The juggernaut of your mission will grind to a halt if you never maintain the engine. So the answer is to batch less important (but still necessary) tasks into focused sessions. Spend 15-20 minutes processing email, for example. These batch sessions become essential.

There are other ways to work with these ideas. For example, you might spend half a day, or an entire week, focused entirely on something really essential. You might structure your day so that you are doing certain tasks at certain times — meditate and write in the morning, messages and meetings and workouts in the afternoons, for example. But none of that is essential to the approach.

The main idea is to have structured sessions for essential tasks, turn toward the groundlessness and pour yourself into it with meaning and joy. It’s that simple.

Valuable Post

By Leo Babauta

I don’t care about being efficient and productive just to be a better person, to get more done, to be more awesome. Cranking out more stuff for productivity’s sake doesn’t interest me anymore (it used to).

Today, I care about productivity only as it affects my mission.

I’m on a mission to change the world, and if I can be more focused, effective, and powerful as I do that … then it serves the mission.

What doesn’t serve the mission is burning myself out. I’m in this for the long haul, and rest and self-care are incredibly important.

I also don’t want to just have my nose to the grindstone. I care about the experience I’m having as I’m on my mission — it needs to be powerful, joyful, meaningful. I’m not just cranking widgets.

With that context in mind … let’s look at what is essential to this kind of productivity — what I think of as Essential Meaningful Productivity.

What’s Essential Meaningful Productivity

There’s three parts to this:

  1. Essential: You focus on what’s essential, not just busywork, not what feels urgent, not on what other people are asking you for (though what’s essential might be some of all three of those). This should be essential for your mission or something incredibly important to you (health, loved ones, etc.). Work on what matters. This means getting clear every day on what’s essential to you.
  2. Meaningful: This should not just feel like the next thing on your task list … it should feel like the most meaningful thing on your task list. You might even open yourself up to feeling like this is your purpose, your joy. This is serving someone out of love, with devotion. It’s like when I made dinner for my wife & kids last night — this was an act of nourishing them, of taking care of them, of loving them. Writing this post feels like that for me. In fact, we can bring that kind of meaning to most tasks, if we practice this kind of devotion.
  3. Productive: In this mode of work, I’m focused. I don’t turn away from the difficulty or discomfort or uncertainty, running to distractions or easier tasks. It’s important, it’s meaningful, it’s an act of love — and the people I’m serving are so worth this discomfort. I clear away distractions, and go into full-screen mode, giving this my entire focus.

As you can see, these three parts overlap quite a bit. Each word is really describing a different aspect of the same thing, but each is useful.

So how do you do this? Let’s look at the keys to making this happen.

The Keys to Essential Meaningful Productivity

You can actually do this in an infinite number of ways, but here are some elements I’ve found to be important in my own exploration:

  1. Work on what matters. Do you know your most important tasks for today? For the week? For the month? For your mission or life? This is something to get clear on. We don’t always have to be perfect, but the idea is to know what’s essential, and to focus on that more of the time.
  2. Structure sessions. Most of us just go through the day doing random things at random times, with no structure. Some people structure their days so rigidly that there’s no room for spontaneity or rest. The middle way, I’ve found, is to create structured sessions: 30 minutes for working on an essential task, for example. Or 90 minutes for writing. 15 minutes to process your inbox or messages. Two ideas: do your top most important task for 60-90 minutes at the start of every day. First thing. Second, do focused pomodoro sessions (25 minutes of focus on one task) 6 times throughout the day, every day.
  3. Pour yourself into it. Put meaning & joy into each session. OK, you’re starting a session. Make this a meaningful session — first, by reminding yourself why this is meaningful to you. Second, by pouring yourself into it fully, as if this were the most important thing in the universe. The only thing in the universe. Third, let yourself play, find joy, or otherwise /feel alive/ during this session!
  4. Turn towards instead of away. You will feel uncertainty, fear or discomfort around some of your most important tasks. That’s called “groundlessness” — the uncertainty of not having solid ground under your feet. Instead of turning away, turn towards this task. Stay with the groundlessness, mindfully. Be present with the fear and uncertainty, but don’t let it force you to exit. Let it be an act of love and devotion to stay in the middle of the groundlessness as you do the task.
  5. Put smaller things into focused sessions. It might be true that few individual emails or messages or errands are going to be essential — so under the guidelines above, you might think you should never answer those emails or messages, never do the errands. But doing errands, paying bills, answering emails — these are all important at some level. The juggernaut of your mission will grind to a halt if you never maintain the engine. So the answer is to batch less important (but still necessary) tasks into focused sessions. Spend 15-20 minutes processing email, for example. These batch sessions become essential.

There are other ways to work with these ideas. For example, you might spend half a day, or an entire week, focused entirely on something really essential. You might structure your day so that you are doing certain tasks at certain times — meditate and write in the morning, messages and meetings and workouts in the afternoons, for example. But none of that is essential to the approach.

The main idea is to have structured sessions for essential tasks, turn toward the groundlessness and pour yourself into it with meaning and joy. It’s that simple.

<3self-improvement ?

Friendship is powerful. And it’s complicated — which makes a close friendship like Aminatou Sow and Ann Friedman’s truly extraordinary. 

As the co-hosts of the wildly popular podcast, Call Your Girlfriend, hundreds of thousands of listeners tune in each week to hear these two friends chat about everything from books to politics. Aminatou and Ann as are passionate and thoughtful as they come — even if it means disagreeing with each other on air. 

Team Forleo and I have been fans of theirs for a long time so, when I heard they had a new book coming out, I had to get them on The Marie Forleo Podcast.


“Friendship is a really complex relationship that brings out the best and worst in everyone.” @aminatou & @annfriedman
Click To Tweet


Today you’ll hear Aminatou Sow and Ann Friedman talk about their phenomenal new book, Big Friendship. It’s a deep dive into how to stay close, especially when friendship gets messy. 

As Aminatou says, “Friendship is a really complex relationship that brings out the best and worst in everyone.”

If distance or disagreements have ever threatened to end one of your close friendships, then this episode is a must-listen.

Tune in to learn:

4:15— The Gossip Girl meet cute that ignited a life-long friendship.
12:16 — What to know *before* you start a podcast.
18:20 — How to create consistent content without burning out.
24:00 — Their Shine Theory philosophy that keeps toxicity out of friendship.
29:14 — How to address conflict or disconnect in a friendship.
38:30 — How white people can get better at talking about race.
47:38 — The beautiful and messy process that goes into co-writing a book like Big Friendship.

Aminatou and Ann don’t hold back! Hit play now or download from wherever you listen to podcasts.

View Transcript

Check out this episode on The Marie Forleo Podcast

Listen Now

DIVE DEEPER: Learn how to make friends as an adult and how to make time for your friends when your schedule is out of control.

Now, Aminatou, Ann, and I would love to hear from you.

Which part of our conversation resonated most and why? What can you do to turn that insight into action now?

Leave a comment below and let us know. Remember, share as much detail as possible in your reply. Thousands of incredible souls come here each week for insight and motivation, and your story may help someone else have a meaningful breakthrough.

Important: share your thoughts and ideas directly in the comments. Links to other posts, videos, etc. will be removed.

Never underestimate the power of filling your life with compassionate, supportive people. If you’re looking for a new friendship mantra, here’s an excellent one from Aminatou and Ann: “I don’t shine if you don’t shine.”

With enormous love,

XO

The post How to Do Big, Messy Friendship with Aminatou Sow & Ann Friedman appeared first on .

Who else thinks mindset is cool ?

Friendship is powerful. And it’s complicated — which makes a close friendship like Aminatou Sow and Ann Friedman’s truly extraordinary. 

As the co-hosts of the wildly popular podcast, Call Your Girlfriend, hundreds of thousands of listeners tune in each week to hear these two friends chat about everything from books to politics. Aminatou and Ann as are passionate and thoughtful as they come — even if it means disagreeing with each other on air. 

Team Forleo and I have been fans of theirs for a long time so, when I heard they had a new book coming out, I had to get them on The Marie Forleo Podcast.


“Friendship is a really complex relationship that brings out the best and worst in everyone.” @aminatou & @annfriedman
Click To Tweet


Today you’ll hear Aminatou Sow and Ann Friedman talk about their phenomenal new book, Big Friendship. It’s a deep dive into how to stay close, especially when friendship gets messy. 

As Aminatou says, “Friendship is a really complex relationship that brings out the best and worst in everyone.”

If distance or disagreements have ever threatened to end one of your close friendships, then this episode is a must-listen.

Tune in to learn:

4:15— The Gossip Girl meet cute that ignited a life-long friendship.
12:16 — What to know *before* you start a podcast.
18:20 — How to create consistent content without burning out.
24:00 — Their Shine Theory philosophy that keeps toxicity out of friendship.
29:14 — How to address conflict or disconnect in a friendship.
38:30 — How white people can get better at talking about race.
47:38 — The beautiful and messy process that goes into co-writing a book like Big Friendship.

Aminatou and Ann don’t hold back! Hit play now or download from wherever you listen to podcasts.

View Transcript

Check out this episode on The Marie Forleo Podcast

Listen Now

DIVE DEEPER: Learn how to make friends as an adult and how to make time for your friends when your schedule is out of control.

Now, Aminatou, Ann, and I would love to hear from you.

Which part of our conversation resonated most and why? What can you do to turn that insight into action now?

Leave a comment below and let us know. Remember, share as much detail as possible in your reply. Thousands of incredible souls come here each week for insight and motivation, and your story may help someone else have a meaningful breakthrough.

Important: share your thoughts and ideas directly in the comments. Links to other posts, videos, etc. will be removed.

Never underestimate the power of filling your life with compassionate, supportive people. If you’re looking for a new friendship mantra, here’s an excellent one from Aminatou and Ann: “I don’t shine if you don’t shine.”

With enormous love,

XO

The post How to Do Big, Messy Friendship with Aminatou Sow & Ann Friedman appeared first on .

Important Info !

By Leo Babauta

I don’t care about being efficient and productive just to be a better person, to get more done, to be more awesome. Cranking out more stuff for productivity’s sake doesn’t interest me anymore (it used to).

Today, I care about productivity only as it affects my mission.

I’m on a mission to change the world, and if I can be more focused, effective, and powerful as I do that … then it serves the mission.

What doesn’t serve the mission is burning myself out. I’m in this for the long haul, and rest and self-care are incredibly important.

I also don’t want to just have my nose to the grindstone. I care about the experience I’m having as I’m on my mission — it needs to be powerful, joyful, meaningful. I’m not just cranking widgets.

With that context in mind … let’s look at what is essential to this kind of productivity — what I think of as Essential Meaningful Productivity.

What’s Essential Meaningful Productivity

There’s three parts to this:

  1. Essential: You focus on what’s essential, not just busywork, not what feels urgent, not on what other people are asking you for (though what’s essential might be some of all three of those). This should be essential for your mission or something incredibly important to you (health, loved ones, etc.). Work on what matters. This means getting clear every day on what’s essential to you.
  2. Meaningful: This should not just feel like the next thing on your task list … it should feel like the most meaningful thing on your task list. You might even open yourself up to feeling like this is your purpose, your joy. This is serving someone out of love, with devotion. It’s like when I made dinner for my wife & kids last night — this was an act of nourishing them, of taking care of them, of loving them. Writing this post feels like that for me. In fact, we can bring that kind of meaning to most tasks, if we practice this kind of devotion.
  3. Productive: In this mode of work, I’m focused. I don’t turn away from the difficulty or discomfort or uncertainty, running to distractions or easier tasks. It’s important, it’s meaningful, it’s an act of love — and the people I’m serving are so worth this discomfort. I clear away distractions, and go into full-screen mode, giving this my entire focus.

As you can see, these three parts overlap quite a bit. Each word is really describing a different aspect of the same thing, but each is useful.

So how do you do this? Let’s look at the keys to making this happen.

The Keys to Essential Meaningful Productivity

You can actually do this in an infinite number of ways, but here are some elements I’ve found to be important in my own exploration:

  1. Work on what matters. Do you know your most important tasks for today? For the week? For the month? For your mission or life? This is something to get clear on. We don’t always have to be perfect, but the idea is to know what’s essential, and to focus on that more of the time.
  2. Structure sessions. Most of us just go through the day doing random things at random times, with no structure. Some people structure their days so rigidly that there’s no room for spontaneity or rest. The middle way, I’ve found, is to create structured sessions: 30 minutes for working on an essential task, for example. Or 90 minutes for writing. 15 minutes to process your inbox or messages. Two ideas: do your top most important task for 60-90 minutes at the start of every day. First thing. Second, do focused pomodoro sessions (25 minutes of focus on one task) 6 times throughout the day, every day.
  3. Pour yourself into it. Put meaning & joy into each session. OK, you’re starting a session. Make this a meaningful session — first, by reminding yourself why this is meaningful to you. Second, by pouring yourself into it fully, as if this were the most important thing in the universe. The only thing in the universe. Third, let yourself play, find joy, or otherwise /feel alive/ during this session!
  4. Turn towards instead of away. You will feel uncertainty, fear or discomfort around some of your most important tasks. That’s called “groundlessness” — the uncertainty of not having solid ground under your feet. Instead of turning away, turn towards this task. Stay with the groundlessness, mindfully. Be present with the fear and uncertainty, but don’t let it force you to exit. Let it be an act of love and devotion to stay in the middle of the groundlessness as you do the task.
  5. Put smaller things into focused sessions. It might be true that few individual emails or messages or errands are going to be essential — so under the guidelines above, you might think you should never answer those emails or messages, never do the errands. But doing errands, paying bills, answering emails — these are all important at some level. The juggernaut of your mission will grind to a halt if you never maintain the engine. So the answer is to batch less important (but still necessary) tasks into focused sessions. Spend 15-20 minutes processing email, for example. These batch sessions become essential.

There are other ways to work with these ideas. For example, you might spend half a day, or an entire week, focused entirely on something really essential. You might structure your day so that you are doing certain tasks at certain times — meditate and write in the morning, messages and meetings and workouts in the afternoons, for example. But none of that is essential to the approach.

The main idea is to have structured sessions for essential tasks, turn toward the groundlessness and pour yourself into it with meaning and joy. It’s that simple.

Anything related to this is very important

The Opportunity in Adversity

By Eckhart Tolle

Life unfolds between the polarities of order and chaos. It is important at this time to recognize these two fundamental opposites, without which the world could not even be. Another word for disorder is “adversity.” When it becomes more extreme, we might call it “chaos.”

We would prefer, of course, to have order in our lives, which means to have things going well. We would like relative harmony in our lives. Yet, that very often is marred by the eruption of some form of disorder. And, usually, we resent that—we get angry, or despondent, or sad.

Disorder comes in many, many forms, big and small. When disorder comes it usually creates a kind of havoc in our lives, accompanied by strong underlying beliefs. “There’s something very wrong, this should not be happening, maybe God is against me,” and so on. Again, we need to understand that disorder, or adversity, is inevitable and is an essential part of a higher order.

 From a higher perspective, a higher level, the existence of order and disorder, or order and chaos, is a necessary part of the evolution of life.

 Many people have found that they experience a deepening, or a deeper sense of self or beingness, immediately after and as a result of having endured a period of disorder or chaos. This is sometimes called “the dark night of the soul,” a term from medieval Christianity used to describe the mental breakdown that many mystics experienced prior to awakening spiritually. There was an eruption of disorder, of destruction. Then, out of that, a deeper realization arose.

 And although that can be very painful, the strange thing is, it’s precisely there that many humans experience a transcendence. A strange fact is that it almost never happens that people awaken spiritually while they’re in their comfort zone. Or that they become deeper as human beings, which would be a partial awakening. It almost never happens. The place where the evolutionary shift happens, or the evolutionary leap, is usually the experience of disorder in a person’s life.

And so your life then moves between order and disorder. You have both, and they’re both necessary. There’s no guarantee that when disorder erupts this will bring about an awakening or a deepening, but there’s always the possibility. It is an opportunity, but often, it is missed.

 So here we are at this time, and our mission is the same: to align with the present moment, with whatever is happening here and now. The upheaval that we’re experiencing at the present time probably will not be the last upheaval that’s going to come on a collective level. However, it is an opportunity—because although this is a time for upheavals, it is also a time for awakening. The two go together. Just as in an individual life, you need adversity to awaken. It’s an opportunity but not a guarantee. And so what looks tragic and unpleasant on a conventional level is actually perfectly fine and as it should be on a higher level; it would not be happening otherwise. It’s all part of the awakening of human beings and of planetary awakening.

To learn more about Eckhart’s teachings on Conscious Manifestation, click here.

Join for free and receive upcoming articles, teachings, special announcements, and more.

var fieldMaps = {};

 

The post The Opportunity in Adversity appeared first on Eckhart Tolle | Official Site – Spiritual Teachings and Tools For Personal Growth and Happiness.